4 doctors weighed in:

Can a 12 month old baby catch a cold sore virus from a daycare worker? If so, is it a major health problem? My 35 year old son is a border line "germ freak" so when he took his son, 12 months old, to their (excellent) daycare, my son pulled him out when h

4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Robert Jackson
Dermatology
2 doctors agree

In brief: Yes

80 to 90% of people have been exposed to the cold sore virus.
It's very common.

In brief: Yes

80 to 90% of people have been exposed to the cold sore virus.
It's very common.
Dr. Robert Jackson
Dr. Robert Jackson
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Nguyen Nguyen
The answer to the second question is: No, it's not a major health problem! As Dr. Jackson said, it is very common, and the condition goes away by itself in a few days.
Dr. Laura McMullen
Pediatrics

In brief: Cold

Cold sores or fever blisters are caused by herpes simplex virus type 1 (hsv-1) and are extremely common.
Most people become infected as an infant or small child when kissed or by sharing eating utensils with an adult who has the virus. The virus is most contagious when someone has a cold sore, but can still be passed along by someone who does not. Many people do not even know that they are infected because the virus can "hide out" in the nerve cells for very long periods of time - for some people it hides out forever and they never get a cold sore. For others, the virus can "wake up" and that's when a cold sore happens. No one knows exactly what causes a cold sore to appear - sometimes stress, illness, fevers, colds, sunlight, cold weather, menstruation, certain foods, allergies, you name it! they usually last 7-10 days and are more of an annoyance than a danger unless you have a weakened immune system or contract a bacterial infection on top of the cold sore. As long as the daycare worker with the cold sore practices good hand washing and does not kiss or share utensils with the children, they should be fine. And with more than 50% of the adult population with hsv-1 infections (not to mention the other children who probably contracted it at some point from parents and other relatives), your son is going to be hard pressed to find an hsv-1 free daycare. Especially when cold-sore free doesn't necessarily mean hsv-1 free! legal disclaimer: I am providing this general and basic information as a public service and my response to this question does not constitute a doctor-patient relationship. For any additional information, advice, or specific concerns, please speak with your own physician. The information provided is current as of the date of the answer entry.

In brief: Cold

Cold sores or fever blisters are caused by herpes simplex virus type 1 (hsv-1) and are extremely common.
Most people become infected as an infant or small child when kissed or by sharing eating utensils with an adult who has the virus. The virus is most contagious when someone has a cold sore, but can still be passed along by someone who does not. Many people do not even know that they are infected because the virus can "hide out" in the nerve cells for very long periods of time - for some people it hides out forever and they never get a cold sore. For others, the virus can "wake up" and that's when a cold sore happens. No one knows exactly what causes a cold sore to appear - sometimes stress, illness, fevers, colds, sunlight, cold weather, menstruation, certain foods, allergies, you name it! they usually last 7-10 days and are more of an annoyance than a danger unless you have a weakened immune system or contract a bacterial infection on top of the cold sore. As long as the daycare worker with the cold sore practices good hand washing and does not kiss or share utensils with the children, they should be fine. And with more than 50% of the adult population with hsv-1 infections (not to mention the other children who probably contracted it at some point from parents and other relatives), your son is going to be hard pressed to find an hsv-1 free daycare. Especially when cold-sore free doesn't necessarily mean hsv-1 free! legal disclaimer: I am providing this general and basic information as a public service and my response to this question does not constitute a doctor-patient relationship. For any additional information, advice, or specific concerns, please speak with your own physician. The information provided is current as of the date of the answer entry.
Dr. Laura McMullen
Dr. Laura McMullen
Thank
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