Do cataracts have to be "ripe" before that are to be removed? Or can it be done at any time? I was told by a local eye doctor that I have cataracts and wanted to set up an operation to have them removed. I suggested that we wait a year and then re -evalua

With vision problems. You should have your cataracts operated on cataracts when they affect your activitities of daily living. "you have problems doing things you like, or need to do", or there is medical reasons that the cataracts should be taken care of (causing glaucoma!). There is no set vision (i.e. 20/40 or 20/50) that indicates you should have surgery. You should have symptoms, or need to pass drivers exam.
No. Do to modern-day surgical techniques cataracs no longer need to be ripe in order to warrant removal. They must limit vision and cause appropriate symptoms.
It. It is best to have cataract surgery when you feel your vision is not clear enough for your lifestyle. Poor vision for night driving, or difficulty reading fine print are common complaints. For most patients, a reduction of best corrected (with eyeglasses or contact lenses) vision to 20/40 or 20/50 is where patients start to notice their vision is impaired. This is the level of vision that many patients decide to have cataract surgery. Some patients do wait until their vision is worse than the 20/40 to 20/50 level.
The. The best way to determine if you should consider cataract surgery now is to ask yourself one simple question: am I happy with my current vision or is my sight getting to the point where it is hard for me to do my daily activities? If you're an airplane pilot, you will likely want cataract surgery when the cataracts are not too severe. You'd rather have an early cataract surgery than crash the plane. If you drive a lot, you will likely want to have cataract surgery before you fail the vision screening for your driver's license. If you spend the whole day gardening and you don't drive, you may be happy with 20/60 vision and then there's no rush to do cataract surgery. In the old days, with the older techniques of surgery, there was a higher risk of complications. For this reason, eye surgeons waited until cataracts were quite severe, often to the point of legal blindness so that no matter what happened during surgery, the patients would be happy. If you start with 20/200 vision and the old style cataract surgery (which used to be done with scissors, stitches, etc) gave you 20/80 vision, then you would be happy. This is when the saying "wait until it's ripe" came from. Waiting until a cataract is "ripe" does not make any sense for modern day, new techniques of cataract surgery. Today cataract surgery can be done with no needles, no bleeding, no stitches, no pain, no eye patch, and in 10 minutes or so. Typical patients should be able to recover excellent vision, enough to pass the driving test, the day after cataract surgery. Discuss your options with your eye surgeon. If you're happy with your vision, do nothing. If you'd like to see better, then consider cataract surgery. Best of luck with your decision, uday uday devgan, md, facs, frcs www. Devganeye. Com devgan eye surgery, los angeles & beverly hills, ca facs: fellow of the american college of surgeons frcs: fellow of the royal college of surgeons, glasgow uk.
Not necessarily. For insurance, they should affect your ability to function: driving, watching tv, work, do a crossword etc. Once they do and it seems like that is the cause of the vision loss, it is reasonable to have cataract surgery. It can be removed earlier for convenience and this is considered a refractive procedure and not covered by insurance. This is a clear lens extraction or refractive lens exchange.
Cataract. In past:Cataract surgery had significant risks (infection, loss of vision, eye) which may not have outweighed benefit. While these risks are still present, they are significantly less: thus benefit often outweighs risk extensively. If best vision is worse than 20/40 or glare is significantly affecting vision, most surgeons prefer to do surgery sooner: See full answer: eyedoc2020.blogspot. Com.