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Just had a CT scan results and dr says found mass on pancreas wants to do MRI what are my options she mentioned surgery ? How common is this and what caused it. Don't smoke, drink or use drugs. My doctor is at the va clinic should I consult a private

5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Boris Aronzon
Anesthesiology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Serious

Find oncology surgeon, usually in the university medical center.

In brief: Serious

Find oncology surgeon, usually in the university medical center.
Dr. Boris Aronzon
Dr. Boris Aronzon
Thank
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Masses

Masses in the pancreas can be very serious and need to be acted upon quickly.
The MRI is necessary to gain additional information about the characteristics of the mass (ie., where it is located, size, shape, presence of other massess or abnormalities). Often after an MRI a patient will need to undergo a biopsy of the mass, which can be performed with a special endoscopy procedure, with ct guidance, or, rarely, with invasive surgery. The results of these tests will determine the next course of action. If the mass appears malignant or cancerous but it hasn't spread, surgery will probably be recommended to remove the mass and a portion of surrounding pancreas and sometimes other organs. Unfortunately, 50% of pancreatic cancer is discovered after it has spread to other organs. In this situation, chemotherapy can be done to extend survival, but rarely cures the disease. Sometimes pancreatic masses are not the dreaded pancreatic adenocarcinoma, but other, less aggresive tumors, such as neuroendocrine tumors (masses of hormone-producing cells), lymphoma, pancreatitis (pancreatic inflammation), or even mis-reads on the original ct. It may seem like a lot of tests, but the pancreas is a tricky organ and we must do our due diligence to fully characterize the mass prior to recommending any course of action.

In brief: Masses

Masses in the pancreas can be very serious and need to be acted upon quickly.
The MRI is necessary to gain additional information about the characteristics of the mass (ie., where it is located, size, shape, presence of other massess or abnormalities). Often after an MRI a patient will need to undergo a biopsy of the mass, which can be performed with a special endoscopy procedure, with ct guidance, or, rarely, with invasive surgery. The results of these tests will determine the next course of action. If the mass appears malignant or cancerous but it hasn't spread, surgery will probably be recommended to remove the mass and a portion of surrounding pancreas and sometimes other organs. Unfortunately, 50% of pancreatic cancer is discovered after it has spread to other organs. In this situation, chemotherapy can be done to extend survival, but rarely cures the disease. Sometimes pancreatic masses are not the dreaded pancreatic adenocarcinoma, but other, less aggresive tumors, such as neuroendocrine tumors (masses of hormone-producing cells), lymphoma, pancreatitis (pancreatic inflammation), or even mis-reads on the original ct. It may seem like a lot of tests, but the pancreas is a tricky organ and we must do our due diligence to fully characterize the mass prior to recommending any course of action.
Dr. Beth Schrope
Dr. Beth Schrope
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Anthony Filly
Good news is that if they are ordering an MRI, it is likely because it is a cystic lesion and they want to check if it communicates with the duct. This would be the only real reason to do an MRI. These type of lesions are much more likely to be benign.
Dr. Mary Maluccio
Surgery - Oncology

In brief: Many possibilities

An incidental mass on the pancreas can be one of many things, including a cancer.
An MRI is a good modality to try to better characterize the lesion and raise or lower our suspicion of it representing a cancer and further evaluation including possible surgery.

In brief: Many possibilities

An incidental mass on the pancreas can be one of many things, including a cancer.
An MRI is a good modality to try to better characterize the lesion and raise or lower our suspicion of it representing a cancer and further evaluation including possible surgery.
Dr. Mary Maluccio
Dr. Mary Maluccio
Thank
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