2 doctors weighed in:

My 6 week old son seems to be breathing somewhat labored with a stuffy nose. Please advise? House is very warm, it is hot in my home however I have removed all clothing excdept diaper and kept him hydrated, please advise, thank you.

2 doctors weighed in
Dr. James Ferguson
Pediatrics

In brief: Little noses

Irritants like perfume & dust can make the nose swell inside & the mucous they make may rattle.
As the swelling increases the work of breathing increases & breathing becomes more noticeable. If babies activity or feeding is pretty normal, simple nasal wash out with saline can improve things. If babies activity changes & they seem fussy, tired or not interested in feeding, it's time for a visit.

In brief: Little noses

Irritants like perfume & dust can make the nose swell inside & the mucous they make may rattle.
As the swelling increases the work of breathing increases & breathing becomes more noticeable. If babies activity or feeding is pretty normal, simple nasal wash out with saline can improve things. If babies activity changes & they seem fussy, tired or not interested in feeding, it's time for a visit.
Dr. James Ferguson
Dr. James Ferguson
Thank
Dr. Laura McMullen
Pediatrics

In brief: Anytime

Anytime a child has difficulty breathing (respiratory distress), they need immediate medical attention.
The signs of respiratory distress are: -rapid breathing (more than 60 times a minute) -grunting or gasping with breathing -flaring of the nostrils -working hard and using extra muscles to breathe such as sucking in at the neck or under the rib cage -blue or dusky coloring -change in speech or level of alertness if your child has any of these symptoms, you need to either call 911, take them to the emergency room or call your child's doctor depending on the severity of the situation. That being said, if your child has none of the above symptoms and just has nasal congestion, you can suction out the mucus to make him more comfortable. First, you can place 2-3 drops of saline into his nose to moisten the mucus and then use a bulb suction to suck it out. You can also run a cool mist humidifier to keep the air around him moist to prevent the mucus from becoming too thick and making it harder for him to breathe. There are no cold medicines that are safe to give infants. Legal disclaimer: I am providing this general and basic information as a public service and my response to this question does not constitute a doctor-patient relationship. For any additional information, advice, or specific concerns, please speak with your own physician. The information provided is current as of the date of the answer entry.

In brief: Anytime

Anytime a child has difficulty breathing (respiratory distress), they need immediate medical attention.
The signs of respiratory distress are: -rapid breathing (more than 60 times a minute) -grunting or gasping with breathing -flaring of the nostrils -working hard and using extra muscles to breathe such as sucking in at the neck or under the rib cage -blue or dusky coloring -change in speech or level of alertness if your child has any of these symptoms, you need to either call 911, take them to the emergency room or call your child's doctor depending on the severity of the situation. That being said, if your child has none of the above symptoms and just has nasal congestion, you can suction out the mucus to make him more comfortable. First, you can place 2-3 drops of saline into his nose to moisten the mucus and then use a bulb suction to suck it out. You can also run a cool mist humidifier to keep the air around him moist to prevent the mucus from becoming too thick and making it harder for him to breathe. There are no cold medicines that are safe to give infants. Legal disclaimer: I am providing this general and basic information as a public service and my response to this question does not constitute a doctor-patient relationship. For any additional information, advice, or specific concerns, please speak with your own physician. The information provided is current as of the date of the answer entry.
Dr. Laura McMullen
Dr. Laura McMullen
Thank
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