7 doctors weighed in:
Is it normal to remove small bladder cancer tumors instead of using bcg?
7 doctors weighed in

Dr. James Krick
Urology
2 doctors agree
In brief: Yes
Small tumors can effectively be treated by cystoscopic excision and fulguration.
Intravesical BCG therapy can be used to help prevent recurrences of high grade tumors once removed

In brief: Yes
Small tumors can effectively be treated by cystoscopic excision and fulguration.
Intravesical BCG therapy can be used to help prevent recurrences of high grade tumors once removed
Dr. James Krick
Dr. James Krick
Thank
Dr. Jesse Mills
Urology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Yes
Your urologist needs to remove all visible cancer prior to any chemotherapy or radiation for bladder cancer.

In brief: Yes
Your urologist needs to remove all visible cancer prior to any chemotherapy or radiation for bladder cancer.
Dr. Jesse Mills
Dr. Jesse Mills
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Dr. Bertram Yuh
Urology - Oncology
In brief: Both are correct
Small bladder tumors are usually removed with surgical resection.
However in cases such as multiple tumors, difficult to see tumors, in situ tumors, higher grade tumors, or larger tumors BCG may have additional benefits.

In brief: Both are correct
Small bladder tumors are usually removed with surgical resection.
However in cases such as multiple tumors, difficult to see tumors, in situ tumors, higher grade tumors, or larger tumors BCG may have additional benefits.
Dr. Bertram Yuh
Dr. Bertram Yuh
Thank
In brief: Yes
Yes. In fact it ithe standard of care to remove all tumors prior to bcg, if possible.
All visible lesions are to be removed from the bladder. Depending on various factors such as the size, location, etc., the entire lesion may be able to be removed in its entirety. Depending on the type of cancer, size, and ability to remove the entire lesoin, BCG may then be an option for the patient.

In brief: Yes
Yes. In fact it ithe standard of care to remove all tumors prior to bcg, if possible.
All visible lesions are to be removed from the bladder. Depending on various factors such as the size, location, etc., the entire lesion may be able to be removed in its entirety. Depending on the type of cancer, size, and ability to remove the entire lesoin, BCG may then be an option for the patient.
Dr. Moez Khorsandi
Dr. Moez Khorsandi
Thank
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