9 doctors weighed in:

How do we choose the right intraocular cataract lenses for my mother's cataract surgery? My mother is in her 70's and will need cataract surgery in the near future. There are so many types of intraocular cataract lenses. How do we know which one is the be

9 doctors weighed in
Dr. Andrew Shatz
Ophthalmology
3 doctors agree

In brief: Speak to the doctor

The good news is the bad news in cataract surgery: there are so lens many choices, it can be mind-boggling! the key to making the right decision is to sit with the surgeon and spend as much time as is needed to be sure that you understand each choice, and to be sure that the doctor understands your mother's vision and lifestyle needs.
After that, the decision should become a lot easier.

In brief: Speak to the doctor

The good news is the bad news in cataract surgery: there are so lens many choices, it can be mind-boggling! the key to making the right decision is to sit with the surgeon and spend as much time as is needed to be sure that you understand each choice, and to be sure that the doctor understands your mother's vision and lifestyle needs.
After that, the decision should become a lot easier.
Dr. Andrew Shatz
Dr. Andrew Shatz
Thank
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology
2 doctors agree

In brief: Cataract surgery

I recommend you discuss this with your surgeon and base it on your mom's specific lifestyle needs.
You do not need to get fancy, the majority of the people receive mono focal lenses in both eyes targeting distance vision and then they need help for close work such as reading (typically over the counter readers are perfect).

In brief: Cataract surgery

I recommend you discuss this with your surgeon and base it on your mom's specific lifestyle needs.
You do not need to get fancy, the majority of the people receive mono focal lenses in both eyes targeting distance vision and then they need help for close work such as reading (typically over the counter readers are perfect).
Dr. Michael Ham
Dr. Michael Ham
Thank
Dr. Sandra Lora Cremers
Ophthalmology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Depends:

It can be very confusing as we now have choices for implants.
If her retina/eye structure is normal, decision depends on her usual daily activities: does she mind glasses? Multifocal (for distance, computer, reading vision; not good for night drivers--some halos/glare); Accommodating (less halos/glare; good for distance, computer, more likely to need readers); Toric. More @ eyedoc2020@blogspot.com

In brief: Depends:

It can be very confusing as we now have choices for implants.
If her retina/eye structure is normal, decision depends on her usual daily activities: does she mind glasses? Multifocal (for distance, computer, reading vision; not good for night drivers--some halos/glare); Accommodating (less halos/glare; good for distance, computer, more likely to need readers); Toric. More @ eyedoc2020@blogspot.com
Dr. Sandra Lora Cremers
Dr. Sandra Lora Cremers
Thank
Dr. Jay Bradley
Ophthalmology - LASIK Surgery

In brief: Lens implants

Your decision should focus on whether she has astigmatism or not, whether she wants to be as glasses free or does not care, and if she wants to consider near/distance/monovision.
Ask your surgeon.

In brief: Lens implants

Your decision should focus on whether she has astigmatism or not, whether she wants to be as glasses free or does not care, and if she wants to consider near/distance/monovision.
Ask your surgeon.
Dr. Jay Bradley
Dr. Jay Bradley
Thank
Dr. John Cason
Ophthalmology

In brief: Just

Just 5-10 years ago there was really only one option.
..Monofocal (one distance) correction. Now you can choose between monovision (one eye distance/one eye near), multifocal (two distances in each lens), accommodative lens, and astigmatism correction. Monofocal and monovision typically do not have any additional cost. The others will require approximately $1000-$2000 per eye in additional cost to achieve a refractive result that is above and beyond the basic results of the surgery that insurances will cover. The "best" lens is the one that matches your mother's lifestyle, desires, and financial means. This important decision is best made with the surgeon who will perform the surgery. Best regards, jc.

In brief: Just

Just 5-10 years ago there was really only one option.
..Monofocal (one distance) correction. Now you can choose between monovision (one eye distance/one eye near), multifocal (two distances in each lens), accommodative lens, and astigmatism correction. Monofocal and monovision typically do not have any additional cost. The others will require approximately $1000-$2000 per eye in additional cost to achieve a refractive result that is above and beyond the basic results of the surgery that insurances will cover. The "best" lens is the one that matches your mother's lifestyle, desires, and financial means. This important decision is best made with the surgeon who will perform the surgery. Best regards, jc.
Dr. John Cason
Dr. John Cason
Thank
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