6 doctors weighed in:

Should i worry about my son's flat spot? Our pediatrician recently told us that our son had a flat spot on the back of his head. She said we could leave it or have a pediatric plastic surgeon take a look at it to see if a helmet is needed. While she act

6 doctors weighed in
Dr. James Ferguson
Pediatrics
2 doctors agree

In brief: How much ??

A statement that the kid has a flat spot doesn't need to send you to a orthotic person for a helmet or anything else.
Explore how much of an issue your son has and the doc's recommendations.Most babies that back sleep as recommended will develop a flat spot. Most will disappear naturally as the kid assumes other positions for sleep or play. If the shape worsens over time a consult is reasonable.

In brief: How much ??

A statement that the kid has a flat spot doesn't need to send you to a orthotic person for a helmet or anything else.
Explore how much of an issue your son has and the doc's recommendations.Most babies that back sleep as recommended will develop a flat spot. Most will disappear naturally as the kid assumes other positions for sleep or play. If the shape worsens over time a consult is reasonable.
Dr. James Ferguson
Dr. James Ferguson
Thank
Dr. Joseph Mele
Surgery - Plastics
1 doctor agrees

In brief: It's age dependent

It all depends on how old your son is.
The skull doubles in size several times before adulthood. Flat spots due to sleeping positions often round out with time. Flat spots due to premature closure of the skull sutures, on the other hand, may require a pediatric plastic surgeon or craniofacial surgeon. It is not possible to provide a complete answer without a physical examination.

In brief: It's age dependent

It all depends on how old your son is.
The skull doubles in size several times before adulthood. Flat spots due to sleeping positions often round out with time. Flat spots due to premature closure of the skull sutures, on the other hand, may require a pediatric plastic surgeon or craniofacial surgeon. It is not possible to provide a complete answer without a physical examination.
Dr. Joseph Mele
Dr. Joseph Mele
Thank
Dr. Thomas Fiala
Surgery - Plastics

In brief: Consult

Yes - speak to an expert - in this case a pediatric plastic surgeon or craniofacial plastic surgeon.
Often, this can be treated non-surgically, with either simple re-positioning of how your son sleeps, or a helmet.

In brief: Consult

Yes - speak to an expert - in this case a pediatric plastic surgeon or craniofacial plastic surgeon.
Often, this can be treated non-surgically, with either simple re-positioning of how your son sleeps, or a helmet.
Dr. Thomas Fiala
Dr. Thomas Fiala
Thank
Dr. Laura McMullen
Pediatrics

In brief: Many

Many infants will develop a flattened area on the back or side of their heads called "positional plagiocephaly".
This is caused by either the infant sleeping with their head in the same position or a problem with tight neck muscles called "torticollis". Luckily, both of these improve with age and can be treated non-surgically with repositioning of the head during sleep and stretching of the neck muscles if torticollis is the problem. If the flattening is severe, but caused by positional plagiocephaly, occasionally parents will opt for reshaping helmets for cosmetic purposes. Craniosynostosis is a condition where the soft growth areas of the skull fuse prematurely causing a misshapen head and sometimes impeding proper brain growth. This condition is more serious and requires surgery. The consultant should be able to tell what your child has and will advise you accordingly. Legal disclaimer: I am providing this general and basic information as a public service and my response to this question does not constitute a doctor-patient relationship. For any additional information, advice, or specific concerns, please speak with your own physician. The information provided is current as of the date of the answer entry.

In brief: Many

Many infants will develop a flattened area on the back or side of their heads called "positional plagiocephaly".
This is caused by either the infant sleeping with their head in the same position or a problem with tight neck muscles called "torticollis". Luckily, both of these improve with age and can be treated non-surgically with repositioning of the head during sleep and stretching of the neck muscles if torticollis is the problem. If the flattening is severe, but caused by positional plagiocephaly, occasionally parents will opt for reshaping helmets for cosmetic purposes. Craniosynostosis is a condition where the soft growth areas of the skull fuse prematurely causing a misshapen head and sometimes impeding proper brain growth. This condition is more serious and requires surgery. The consultant should be able to tell what your child has and will advise you accordingly. Legal disclaimer: I am providing this general and basic information as a public service and my response to this question does not constitute a doctor-patient relationship. For any additional information, advice, or specific concerns, please speak with your own physician. The information provided is current as of the date of the answer entry.
Dr. Laura McMullen
Dr. Laura McMullen
Thank
Get help from a real doctor now
Dr. Cindy Juster
Board Certified, Pediatrics
32 years in practice
2M people helped
Continue
108,000 doctors available
Read more answers from doctors