What is the difference between a bladder infection and uti? Is a bladder infection the same as a urinary tract infection?

UTI. "uti" includes all types of infections in the urinary tract. Cystitis is specifically a term describing inflammation of the bladder. Most often cystitis, although quit irritating, does not cause systemic symptoms such as fever, body aches etc. Pyelonephritis (also a uti) on the other hand is an infection of the kidney causing significant systemic symptoms.
Yes, . Yes, these are two terms for the same thing. Uti(urinary tract infection) is the medical term, while bladder infection is the lay term. Both refer to a bacterial infection of the urinary system that is characterized by some of the follwoing: urinary frequency, burning, hesitancy, cramping, and with ascending infection to the kidney with fevers/chills, sweats and back pain. Uti's need to be treated with antibiotics, so you should call your doctor if you suspect one. Cranberry juice has been shown to help fight certain types of uti.

Related Questions

What can do to ease the pain of bladder infections or urinary tract infections?

Here are some... Are you sure the pain you referred to from UTI? If sure, antibiotics with judicious use of mucosal soothing agent such as pyridium (phenazopyridine) will help to ease; if not, look into other causes for the pain and decide what you need. How to get these confused matters set straight is not that hard if following instructions in http://formefirst.com/eNewsletter06.html; thereby you gain insight on how to... Read more...

What are the consequences of holding your pee? Is bladder infection and urinary tract infections directly correlated to holding your urine?

Avoiding . Avoiding urinating frequently can indeed lead to bladder and other urinary tract infections. Most urinary infections occur when bacteria on the skin advance up the urinary opening (urethra) to the bladder, where they can begin to multiply. This is a particular issue for women, where the distance between the skin and the bladder is relatively short. One of the body's major defenses against ascending bacteria is emptying the bladder. The stream of urine washes away bacteria that are trying to move up the urethra. Additionally, frequent full bladder emptying makes it more difficult for bacteria to establish a stable population (colonization) in the bladder. Out of social habit or due to work demands, many people try to go as long as possible between bathroom breaks. However, this predisposes to urinary infections, as the protective flushing action is lost. Maintaining a high fluid intake and urinating at least every 2 hours during the day helps prevent urinary infections. For people with frequent and recurrent infections, this change can be quite effective. Read more...
Yes. Holding one's urine has been implicated in uti. The best policy is to drink plenty of fluid and empty your bladder on a regular basis. Read more...

Urinary tract infection. Why do girls get UTI after sex if the bladder is not connected to the vagina?

UTI's after sex. Anatomically, nature "screwed-up" and put female parts too close together: please try to partake of lots of fluids before sex/avoid oral intercourse (the human mouth is filthy"), and void immediately after intercourse! Read more...
Bacteria milked up. Bacteria from outside and around the urethral opening, which is only 1-2 millimeters away fro the vaginal opening, get pushed up the urethra by the pumping action of penis in the vagina, which lies directly under the urethra. Thus bacteria are "massaged", pushed or milked up into the bladder where they multiply and cause a uti. Hence advice to empty bladder after sex. Read more...

How do I get a catheter-associated urinary tract infection (ca-uti)?

By being unlucky. Foley catheters are commonly used to drain the bladder when patients are unable to void on their own. If the catheters are put in improperly or left in too long, a bladder infection may occur. They are usually treated by removal of the catheter and treatment with antibiotics. Read more...
For multiple reasons. Once a urinary catheter is placed, bacterial colonization begins as bacteria spread from the skin along the tube. Within 14 days, 100% of patients with a catheter will have a positive urine culture. This should not be treated unless symtomatic to prevent resistance. Good hygiene, proper maintenance, and early removal of the catheter will lessen the risk of uti. Read more...
Foreign body. 1) bacteria located at ou just within urinary opening get pushed up into the bladder, and can occur every time catheter is introduced. 2) everyone with an indwelling catheter will eventually get a uti, takes longer if on antibiotics, but no bladder is immune. Bacteria work their way up between catheter and urethral lining. 3) catheter can be seed for stone formation, also damages bladder lining. Read more...