2 doctors weighed in:

Is there a link between pregnancy and pulmonary embolism? Does being pregnant increase the risk of developing a pulmonary embolism?

2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Michael Dugan
Internal Medicine - Hematology

In brief: There is significant

Abdominal pressure on the inferior vena cava in the second half of pregnancy, so there is always a potential concern regarding DVT and subsequent pe.

In brief: There is significant

Abdominal pressure on the inferior vena cava in the second half of pregnancy, so there is always a potential concern regarding DVT and subsequent pe.
Dr. Michael Dugan
Dr. Michael Dugan
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Dr. Geoffrey Rutledge
Internal Medicine

In brief: Pregnancy

Pregnancy is actually a well-established risk factor for developing a pulmonary embolism (a blood clot which typically arises from a deep vein clot in the legs which then migrates into the lungs).
It has been estimated that pregnant women are 4 to 50 times more likely to develop blood clots (or thromboses) than non-pregnant women, although overall only a small fraction (approximately 0.05%) of pregnancies are affected. Developing a pulmonary embolism during pregnancy remains a substantial problem despite the dramatic decline in pregnancy-related mortality in industrialized countries over the past century. It is now the most common cause of pregnancy-related deaths in the United States. It is possible to develop a pulmonary embolism in any trimester of pregnancy, however it is even more common in the post-partum period, especially if the delivery is by cesarean section. The clinical diagnosis of both a deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (pe) is notoriously difficult during pregnancy. This problem is evident since symptoms of DVT and pe include lower extremity swelling and discomfort which are very common in advanced pregnancy, and women with DVT may present with diffuse pain in the lower abdomen or leg. Shortness of breath, the most frequent symptom of a pe, occurs at some point in up to 70 percent of normal pregnancies, often stabilizing near term. It is therefore important to get medical advice if you think you may have a DVT or pe or are at risk for it.

In brief: Pregnancy

Pregnancy is actually a well-established risk factor for developing a pulmonary embolism (a blood clot which typically arises from a deep vein clot in the legs which then migrates into the lungs).
It has been estimated that pregnant women are 4 to 50 times more likely to develop blood clots (or thromboses) than non-pregnant women, although overall only a small fraction (approximately 0.05%) of pregnancies are affected. Developing a pulmonary embolism during pregnancy remains a substantial problem despite the dramatic decline in pregnancy-related mortality in industrialized countries over the past century. It is now the most common cause of pregnancy-related deaths in the United States. It is possible to develop a pulmonary embolism in any trimester of pregnancy, however it is even more common in the post-partum period, especially if the delivery is by cesarean section. The clinical diagnosis of both a deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (pe) is notoriously difficult during pregnancy. This problem is evident since symptoms of DVT and pe include lower extremity swelling and discomfort which are very common in advanced pregnancy, and women with DVT may present with diffuse pain in the lower abdomen or leg. Shortness of breath, the most frequent symptom of a pe, occurs at some point in up to 70 percent of normal pregnancies, often stabilizing near term. It is therefore important to get medical advice if you think you may have a DVT or pe or are at risk for it.
Dr. Geoffrey Rutledge
Dr. Geoffrey Rutledge
Thank
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