6 doctors weighed in:

Can someone get a sinus infection caused by wisdom teeth extraction?

6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Farhad Sigari
ENT - Head & Neck Surgery
3 doctors agree

In brief: Yes

But only if the tooth was in the upper jaw and the root of the tooth was in the sinus to begin with.
The dentist who performed the extraction should be notified as sometimes a fistula may form from the mouth to the sinus--not fun!

In brief: Yes

But only if the tooth was in the upper jaw and the root of the tooth was in the sinus to begin with.
The dentist who performed the extraction should be notified as sometimes a fistula may form from the mouth to the sinus--not fun!
Dr. Farhad Sigari
Dr. Farhad Sigari
Thank
Dr. Daniel Quon
Surgery - Oral & Maxillofacial

In brief: Yes

Wisdom teeth as well as several posterior teeth in the maxilla are in close proximity to the maxillary sinus.
The maxillary sinus can sometimes be involved during the removal of almost any maxillary posterior tooth, which may lead to an infection of the maxillary sinus.

In brief: Yes

Wisdom teeth as well as several posterior teeth in the maxilla are in close proximity to the maxillary sinus.
The maxillary sinus can sometimes be involved during the removal of almost any maxillary posterior tooth, which may lead to an infection of the maxillary sinus.
Dr. Daniel Quon
Dr. Daniel Quon
Thank
Dr. Dennis Diaz
ENT - Head & Neck Surgery

In brief: Yes

Molar tooth roots can extend into the maxillary (cheek) sinuses.
During a difficult extraction of molar teeth, the bone and mucosal lining around the tooth and sinus floor can get disrupted creating an opening between the mouth and sinus cavity. This opening or fistula, by introducing oral cavity bacteria into the sinus, can lead to sinus disease.

In brief: Yes

Molar tooth roots can extend into the maxillary (cheek) sinuses.
During a difficult extraction of molar teeth, the bone and mucosal lining around the tooth and sinus floor can get disrupted creating an opening between the mouth and sinus cavity. This opening or fistula, by introducing oral cavity bacteria into the sinus, can lead to sinus disease.
Dr. Dennis Diaz
Dr. Dennis Diaz
Thank
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