5 doctors weighed in:

What is male breast cancer? How common is breast cancer in males? Are there any differences between breast cancer in males and females?

5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Travis Kidner
Surgery - Oncology
2 doctors agree

In brief: Cancer

Breast is rare, but does happen.
It is usually detected by the development of a lump behind the nipple. When compared between men and women, they do the same based on the stage of the cancer.

In brief: Cancer

Breast is rare, but does happen.
It is usually detected by the development of a lump behind the nipple. When compared between men and women, they do the same based on the stage of the cancer.
Dr. Travis Kidner
Dr. Travis Kidner
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1 doctor agrees

In brief: Rare

Male breast cancer is quite rare.
Presents as a painless lump under the nipple, most often over age 65. Less than 1% of breast cancers occur in men. Otherwise mastectomy and chemotherapy is commonly indicated. Cell type can be similar to female breast cancer.

In brief: Rare

Male breast cancer is quite rare.
Presents as a painless lump under the nipple, most often over age 65. Less than 1% of breast cancers occur in men. Otherwise mastectomy and chemotherapy is commonly indicated. Cell type can be similar to female breast cancer.
Dr. Mark Hoepfner
Dr. Mark Hoepfner
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Dr. Geoffrey Rutledge
Internal Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Breast

Breast cancer in males is much less common than in females, and makes up less than 1% of all cases of breast cancer. The estimated number of new cases of male breast cancer in the United States in 2010 is 1, 970, compared to 207, 090 new cases of female breast cancer. The most typical age for breast cancer to be diagnosed in a male is between 60 and 70 years old.
Some risk factors increase the chance of getting breast cancer. Previous exposure to radiation, or having female relatives with breast cancer is a similar risk for males and females. Having a disease that leads to high levels of estrogen is also a risk for both males and females, but while women may more commonly experience this risk by taking medication that contains estrogen, men usually have increased estrogen if they have a disease such as cirrhosis or an unusual disorder called klinefelter syndrome. Etiology, prognosis, and treatment are similar in men and women.

In brief: Breast

Breast cancer in males is much less common than in females, and makes up less than 1% of all cases of breast cancer. The estimated number of new cases of male breast cancer in the United States in 2010 is 1, 970, compared to 207, 090 new cases of female breast cancer. The most typical age for breast cancer to be diagnosed in a male is between 60 and 70 years old.
Some risk factors increase the chance of getting breast cancer. Previous exposure to radiation, or having female relatives with breast cancer is a similar risk for males and females. Having a disease that leads to high levels of estrogen is also a risk for both males and females, but while women may more commonly experience this risk by taking medication that contains estrogen, men usually have increased estrogen if they have a disease such as cirrhosis or an unusual disorder called klinefelter syndrome. Etiology, prognosis, and treatment are similar in men and women.
Dr. Geoffrey Rutledge
Dr. Geoffrey Rutledge
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