2 doctors weighed in:

Nutritional ramifications and gastric bypass surgery? What are the nutritional ramifications to gastric bypass surgery? What vitamins can't be absorbed?

2 doctors weighed in

In brief: ADEK

They can be absorbed but not as well.
Also b12, iron , calcium. And protein.

In brief: ADEK

They can be absorbed but not as well.
Also b12, iron , calcium. And protein.
Dr. Terry Simpson
Dr. Terry Simpson
Thank
Dr. Geoffrey Rutledge
Internal Medicine

In brief: There

There are many nutritional changes after bypass surgery and they can vary depending on type of bypass or band.
If you are thinking of undergoing bypass surgery be sure that wherever you are thinking of having the procedure preformed there is a nutritionist as they will be an important part of your medical team. Usually, immediately following surgery, there will be strict guidelines for how much and what types of food to eat. These will loosen over time. It is important to remember that you can still gain weight and have your bypass fail if you continue with poor eating habits. While you will feel full after little food you can stretch the pouch. Avoid foods with high fat and sugar content. Remember at first to eat very slowly, stop when full, chew food well, and concentrate on protein and hydration. Over time, months, you will most likely be able to eat all the foods you used to, but much less. Most often people will eat three, small, well chewed meals per day. Because of changes in gastric acidity and the new structuring of the intestine after roux-en-y gastric bypass the absorption of several micronutrients may be affected; b12, calcium, vitamin d, folate, iron, and thiamine to name a few. Your physician will usually do blood tests at 3 months, 6 months, and then yearly to follow lipid levels, iron levels, B12 and folate levels, calcium, vitamin d and parathyroid hormone levels, and your blood count. Most recommend taking a multivitamin with minerals and iron daily, and a B12 supplement (may be oral or injected). If your iron level is low you may be instructed to take a supplement --only do this if your level is low. You may also need additional calcium or vitamin d depending on your lab work. Patients undergoing lap banding may only need a multivitamin. Above all remember to work closely with your doctor and nutritionist. Weight loss surgery takes a lifelong commitment to be successful.

In brief: There

There are many nutritional changes after bypass surgery and they can vary depending on type of bypass or band.
If you are thinking of undergoing bypass surgery be sure that wherever you are thinking of having the procedure preformed there is a nutritionist as they will be an important part of your medical team. Usually, immediately following surgery, there will be strict guidelines for how much and what types of food to eat. These will loosen over time. It is important to remember that you can still gain weight and have your bypass fail if you continue with poor eating habits. While you will feel full after little food you can stretch the pouch. Avoid foods with high fat and sugar content. Remember at first to eat very slowly, stop when full, chew food well, and concentrate on protein and hydration. Over time, months, you will most likely be able to eat all the foods you used to, but much less. Most often people will eat three, small, well chewed meals per day. Because of changes in gastric acidity and the new structuring of the intestine after roux-en-y gastric bypass the absorption of several micronutrients may be affected; b12, calcium, vitamin d, folate, iron, and thiamine to name a few. Your physician will usually do blood tests at 3 months, 6 months, and then yearly to follow lipid levels, iron levels, B12 and folate levels, calcium, vitamin d and parathyroid hormone levels, and your blood count. Most recommend taking a multivitamin with minerals and iron daily, and a B12 supplement (may be oral or injected). If your iron level is low you may be instructed to take a supplement --only do this if your level is low. You may also need additional calcium or vitamin d depending on your lab work. Patients undergoing lap banding may only need a multivitamin. Above all remember to work closely with your doctor and nutritionist. Weight loss surgery takes a lifelong commitment to be successful.
Dr. Geoffrey Rutledge
Dr. Geoffrey Rutledge
Thank
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