4 doctors weighed in:

Is my anti-depressant causing my constipation? I've started taking an anti-depressant not too long ago, and i seem to have more problems with constipation lately.

4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Alan Ali
Psychiatry
2 doctors agree

In brief: Antidep./Constipatio

Not sure what your antidepressant is, but if it has "drying effect" , such as Elavil (amitriptyline) or trazodone, then it is possible.
Please discuss with your prescribing doc.

In brief: Antidep./Constipatio

Not sure what your antidepressant is, but if it has "drying effect" , such as Elavil (amitriptyline) or trazodone, then it is possible.
Please discuss with your prescribing doc.
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali
Thank
Dr. Geoffrey Rutledge
Internal Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Constipation

Constipation is a very common problem. Many factors can contribute to or cause constipation, although in most people, no single cause can be found.
In general, constipation occurs more frequently as you get older. Treatment for constipation includes changing some behaviors, eating foods high in fiber, and using laxatives or enemas if needed. You can try these treatments at home, before seeing a healthcare provider. However, if you do not have a bowel movement within a few days, you should call your healthcare provider for further assistance. A variety of laxatives are available for treating constipation. The choice between them is based upon how they work, how safe the treatment is, and your healthcare provider's preferences. Bulk forming laxatives include natural fiber and commercial fiber preparations such as psyllium or metamucil. You should increase the dose of fiber supplements slowly to prevent gas and cramping, and you should always take the supplement with plenty of fluid. Hyperosmolar laxatives include medications such as polyethylene glycol (miralax) and have the advantage that they do not cause gas or bloating. Stimulant laxatives such as senna are effective but they must be used cautiously if they are to be used regularly. Finally, a newer treatment such as Lubiprostone (amitiza) is available on prescription and treats severe constipation. It is expensive compared to other agents. However, it may be recommended if you do not respond to other treatments.

In brief: Constipation

Constipation is a very common problem. Many factors can contribute to or cause constipation, although in most people, no single cause can be found.
In general, constipation occurs more frequently as you get older. Treatment for constipation includes changing some behaviors, eating foods high in fiber, and using laxatives or enemas if needed. You can try these treatments at home, before seeing a healthcare provider. However, if you do not have a bowel movement within a few days, you should call your healthcare provider for further assistance. A variety of laxatives are available for treating constipation. The choice between them is based upon how they work, how safe the treatment is, and your healthcare provider's preferences. Bulk forming laxatives include natural fiber and commercial fiber preparations such as psyllium or metamucil. You should increase the dose of fiber supplements slowly to prevent gas and cramping, and you should always take the supplement with plenty of fluid. Hyperosmolar laxatives include medications such as polyethylene glycol (miralax) and have the advantage that they do not cause gas or bloating. Stimulant laxatives such as senna are effective but they must be used cautiously if they are to be used regularly. Finally, a newer treatment such as Lubiprostone (amitiza) is available on prescription and treats severe constipation. It is expensive compared to other agents. However, it may be recommended if you do not respond to other treatments.
Dr. Geoffrey Rutledge
Dr. Geoffrey Rutledge
Thank
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