Is there much of a link between flossing and/or using mouthwash and infections of the heart valves?

Perhaps. Good dental care greatly reduces the risk of bacteria getting in the blood stream from the mouth, but this is likely something that occurs frequently in normal people. Abnormal heart valves are prone to infection so procedures that are likely to cause bacteria entry into blood are hazardous. Flossing is very low risk. Some dental procedures and colonoscopy may require antibiotics for safety.
No. Endocarditis can be caused by extensive dental work where bleeding is likely and bacteria of the mouth can gain access to the vascular system. Flossing usually does not cause bleeding but if so the amount of bacteria released into the blood stream is negligible. Most endocarditis occurs in previously damaged heart valves.
No. Antibiotic prophylaxis is only recommended for dentist treatments, and then only in certain heard conditions.

Related Questions

What is the definition or description of: infection of heart valves?

Endocarditis. When a bacteria gets in the bloodstream, there is a chance of attaching to a heart valve. This is called endocarditis. If this happens, the bacteria can grow, causing lesions called vegetations to appear which can break off and plug small blood vessels in the hand, foot, or brain. The bacterial growth can also cause the valve to leak. If this is significant, valve replacement may be needed. Read more...
Endocarditis . An infection of the cardiac valves, usually aortic or mitral with a bacterium, most commonly staphylococcus or streptococcus. Read more...

Describe the disorder called an infection of the heart valves.?

Endocarditis. It is called endocarditis. Can be caused mostly by bacterias and fungus. It is a very serious condition that requires immediate intervention. Valves can deteriorate fast and hence cardiac function be compromised . Read more...

What are the presenting symptoms of an infection of heart valves?

Numerous. An infection of the heart valves, known as endocarditis, is a very serious disorder. Symptoms usually stem from infection in the blood stream and include fever, chills, possible low blood pressure or even shock, heart failure, shortness of breath, and may include severe damage to the infected valve causing severe leakage of the valve, requiring emergency valve replacement surgery. Read more...

How close are we to "growing" our own heart valves using stem cells?

Not tomorrow but . Hope soon , tissue growth from stem cells is reaching new horizons, already wind pipe 9 trachea ) was grown and used . Heart valves not yet , scientist are working . Read more...
I have not . Seen any study showing any attempts of using stem cells to growth heart valves. Read more...

Does recovery for two heart valves replaceing longer than just one replaceing plz. I av to have two replaced?

It varies. Everyone is different. A lot depends on age, severity of illness and degree of vigor vs. frailty. On average younger people can expect to be back at full strength in 2-3 months. The stronger you are going in to surgery, the quicker the recovery. It varies from person to person, but double valve surgery will likely take longer than single valve. Focus on your goal of full recovery. Read more...

Can you explain how the heart valves opening/closing is synchronized with the heart's pacemaker firing?

One causes the other. The pacemaker of the heart initiates an electrical impulse that spreads across the upper chambers and causes them to contract. Contraction of the atria pushes the atrioventricular valves open. Subsequently, the electrical impulse is transmitted to the lower chambers of the heart. The contraction of the ventricles opens the semilunar valves; at the same time the atrioventricular valves close. Read more...
Passive valves. The heart valves are passive mechanisms. They open as blood flows through them. When blood starts to backflow, they slam shut, causing the sounds you hear when you listen to your heart. So long as the valves are functioning properly, the synchronization is all done by the four chambers, with the valves just opening and closing automatically. Read more...

My doctor said I have thickening around my heart valves. Is that bad? What does that mean?

See a cardiologist. I would suggest that you see a cardiologist and have echo cardiogram. This will further define the problem and dictate therapy. Read more...
Valve thickening. Hi, Fibro-calcific degeneration (thickened valve) most commonly affects the aortic valve. This happens usually in older people and people who have longstanding high blood pressure, also advanced age. This could make the valve narrow and cause Valvular stenosis which the amount of blood flow could travel through the valve decreases. Were you told that you have stenosis,too or just thickening? Read more...
May be. You have serious heart condition at young age. Do you have some congenital ( from Birth) Heart Disease? Or Are you over weight? Obviously you are under care of Cardiologist so ask him/her what it means to have thickened Heart valve. Without seeing a report I cannot interpret and give you conflicting explanation. Read more...