Can walking on calloused feet cause foot ulcers?

Yes. The same risk factors for ulcers in non-calloused foot apply in callused feet. Callouses are not necessarily protective.
Yes. It is common for ulcer to start underlying a previous callus site. Diabetics are especially vulnerable to this because they may have lost sensation in their feet. By not having adequate sensation in their feet, they are more likely to continue walking on the affected area. Prolonged pressure, friction and continued walking on calluses may lead to underlying blistering and foot ulceration.
Yes. If the callouses get too thick they can ulcerate. If you are a diabetic or have decreased sensation in your feet you are at greater risk.

Related Questions

What causes foot ulcers in diabetics?

Foot ulcers. Diabetes causes a condition known as microangiopathy. This is where the microscopic blood vessels become clogged and do not deliver blood to the skin and sub-cutaneous tissue. The decrease in available bloodflow causes these ulcers (wounds) that are very difficult to heal.
See below. Many times those with diabetes develop a loss of adequate sensation in their feet. This often leads to unperceived excessive pressure on skin which can lead to ulcer. Diabetics have a higher rate of artheriosclerosis or poor circulation which can lead more easily to skin break down and delayed or non-healing.
Friction. Most of the time pressure & friction are the main causes when added to decreased blood circulation, decreased immune system.
Diabetic leg ulcers. Diabetics get ulcer due to multiple causes including healing problems, nerve issues, circulation problems with the large and small arteries and pressure issues.
Various factors. Diabetic patients often times will have poor circulation and a diminished healing ability which makes them more susceptible to developing foot infections. The presence of neuropathy is also a main contributor to the development of ulceration. If not treated promptly and appropriately, the foot ulcer can become infected, .

Are there any causes for foot ulcers besides diabetes and sickle cell?

Yes. Other causes for foot ulcers beyond diabetes and sickle cell disease include: bedsores (decubitus ulcers), peripheral vascular disease, varicose veins, trauma (including spider bites), metabolic diseases and malnutrition, scleroderma, and alcoholism (alcoholic neuropathy).
Multifactorial. Some other causes of foot ulcer include trauma, poor arterial or venous circulation, and skin cancer.

Why do diabetics get foot ulcers?

Diabetic ulcers. Diabetes causes a condition known as microangiopathy. This is the clogging of microscopic blood vessels that feed skin and sub-cutaneous tissues. Therefore, if there is any pressure point on the foot, the blood flow is essentially cut off and the skin breaks down as the skin cells die from lack of blood flow.
Neuropathy. Diabetics often times develope decrease in sensation of the feet. This in conjuncion with having possible foot demormities such as bunions, hammertoes, or pominent metatarsal bones may lead to diabetic foot ulcers.
Diabetic leg ulcers. Diabetics get ulcer due to multiple causes including healing problems, nerve issues, circulation problems with the large and small arteries and pressure issues.

Do people who are taking insulin for diabetes get foot ulcers?

No. Hi: people get ulcers due to a breakdown in their skin from excessive sheer and direct pressure to their feet usually because they have neuropathy. The key to not getting ulcers is being under the care of a podiatrist if you are a diabetic on insulin.
They sure can. It is more than whether you take Insulin or oral medications that makes the difference. It is more a consequence of having had diabetes for a prolonged period of time. While it can happen even with good control, it is more likely to happen with poor control of the blood sugar over time. The effects of diabetes on the circulation along with neuropathy and other changes makes one more prone.
They can. Both Insulin and non-insulin dependent diabetics may develop foot ulcers. You do not even need to be a diabetic for you to develop a foot ulcer.

Why do people who are taking insulin for diabetes get foot ulcers?

Several reasons. Diabetics may develop neuropathy, decreased sensation to the skin, which means they are unaware if they step on a thorn or if their shoes are creating a blister on their foot. Nerve damage can lead to bony changes that create abnormal pressure points on the foot. Diabetics also tend to develop small vessel arterial disease, which results in decreased perfusion to the skin and slower wound healing.
Circulation. With uncontrolled diabetes, the circulation gets compromised. As a result, simple wounds don't heal appropriately. If they don/t heal quickly and appropriately, it becomes very easy for bacteria to jump in and wreak havoc.
Insulin. Insulin is for the control of the blood sugars. Often the effects of diabetes are long-standing and the patients develop the complications of the disease unrelated to use of, or not, insulin. This is why we believe that better [tighter] control helps prevent some of the complications of the diabetes.
Neuropathy. Diabetics often times develope decrease in sensation of the feet. This in conjuncion with having possible foot demormities such as bunions, hammertoes, or pominent metatarsal bones may lead to diabetic foot ulcers.
ANYONE. Anyone with diabetes can get a foot ulcer. Insulin-dependent patients just might be more fragile and immunocompromised.