3 doctors weighed in:

What is joint hypermobility and will getting physiotherapy effectively treat it?

3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Bradford Landry
Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Poorly understood dx

JHS is symptomatic hypermobility.
Many individuals who have hypermobility never have pain or require any treatment. When hypermobility is found associated with pain, or a few other criteria (see Brighton criteria) it is termed JHS. It is presumed to be caused by a defect in collagen but rarely have collagen related genes been implicated (TNXB gene).

In brief: Poorly understood dx

JHS is symptomatic hypermobility.
Many individuals who have hypermobility never have pain or require any treatment. When hypermobility is found associated with pain, or a few other criteria (see Brighton criteria) it is termed JHS. It is presumed to be caused by a defect in collagen but rarely have collagen related genes been implicated (TNXB gene).
Dr. Bradford Landry
Dr. Bradford Landry
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Dr. Timothy Trainor
Orthopedic Surgery

In brief: Possibly

Joint hypermobility or laxity can be a normal variant in some individuals; however, it sometimes leads to pain in the hypermobile joint.
This commonly affects the shoulder and is referred to as multi-directional instability. The first treatment for this is physical therapy to strengthen the muscles around the shoulder in order to stabilize the joint.

In brief: Possibly

Joint hypermobility or laxity can be a normal variant in some individuals; however, it sometimes leads to pain in the hypermobile joint.
This commonly affects the shoulder and is referred to as multi-directional instability. The first treatment for this is physical therapy to strengthen the muscles around the shoulder in order to stabilize the joint.
Dr. Timothy Trainor
Dr. Timothy Trainor
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