Is it possible for dental cavities to make teeth look better?

Maybe. If you think that black and brown holes in your teeth are attractive. Cosmetics aside, dental decay is a disease and needs to be treated.
No. Cavities always make teeth look worse because they are an infection in the tooth and the bacteria are in the process of destroying your tooth...Get the cavity treated asap.

Related Questions

Is there a possible way to heal dental cavities without drilling?

Yes. Some dentists use lasers or micro abrasion to remove small carious lesions. Read more...
Rarely. If the decay has not entered the second layer of the tooth called dentin and only in the enamel it could heal itself by using high Fluoride toothpastes. However, once the decay enters the dentin the caries must be treated. Read more...
OZONE treatment. It is not used in the United States very much but pumping ozone gas into the cavity can cause the cavity to heal arrest by killing the bacteria that live within the cavity. The hole will still be there though and it will take some time for the soft parts of the tooth to get hard again. The tooth will probably need a restoration if the cavity was large enough. Read more...
MI Paste Plus. If a carious lesion is limited to only the enamel (outermost) layer of the tooth and has not yet cavitated, if appropriate, your dentist may recommend that you try to remineralize the cavity using amorphous calcium phosphate plus fluoride. The most commonly used form of this med is mi paste plus which you can only get from dental offices. Read more...
Yes! sometimes. Small cavities can be "arrested" by the use of flouride toothpaste, flouride rinses and many professional products . The balance of ph and saliva can also play a role in arresting decay. Talk to your hygienst or dentist about these ideas! Read more...
Drilling. The procedure to remove an amalgam restoration involves drilling out the restoration with a drill. Read more...
Sometimes. There is a condition called 'eburnation' in which the decay hardens. It can occur with a drastic improvement in hygiene. There are gels on the market today which can help to regenerate enamel . You may have to look for a dentist who is aware of these products and their efficacy. Read more...
Air Abrasion. There is new technology we are all using that is called air abrasion which is like a miniature sandblaster that has a very small tip and uses a smaller particle abrasive dust to remove caries and damaged tooth structure, often without local anesthetics! Read more...

Other than fillings, is there any way to reverse damage from dental cavities?

Sometimes. Only with very early signs of decalcification is it possible to remineralize dental enamal (incipient decay). This can be done with high concentrations of flouride. Cavities that have reached the dentin can not be recalcified or reversed and require repair. Read more...
It depends. If the damage is not too extensive, it may be possible to remineralize the tooth enamel. This requires you see a dentist for a prescription of a fluoridated toothpaste which has a more concentrated form of Fluoride in it that over the counter toothpastes. Also, the dentist can also do some in-office procedures which can remineralize the teeth. Deep cavities need fillings. Read more...
Probably not. Once dental decay breaks down tooth structure it is considered irreversible. It is necessary to restore the tooth to its normal shape and size with a filling. Otherwise the cavitation or hole will become a food trap and will increase in size. Read more...
Remineralization. It is thought that a cavity that stays in the enamel only can be remineralized. There are products like mi paste and rx Fluoride that can accomplish this, but very few cavities stay in the enamel. Read more...

What complications can occur with dental cavities? My brother never goes to the dentist and I'm worried he is developing cavities. Is it possible they will affect his overall health? If so, how? .

Dental . Dental diseases including tooth decay can affect a person's overall health. Tooth decay can progress to the point where it can compromise the soft tissue in the center of the tooth. This tissue, called the pulp can become inflamed and infected. This infection can sometimes spread to the soft tissues of the cheek or throat causing serious infections. However, other health risks can come from the chronic low-grade infection of periodontal disease. This can have no symptoms and put an individuals health at risk. Patients with periodontal disease are more likely to have uncontrolled diabetes, more cardiac risks and increased risks of pneumonia. Periodontal disease can contribute to pre-term birth and low birth weight babies just to name a few concerns. Please talk to your brother and encourage him to see a local dentist. Read more...
If . If a cavity goes untreated, your brother risks continued progression of the tooth decay necessitating a larger and larger filing. If it gets too big he may need a crown to fix the problem. Additionally, as a cavity progresses it will approach the nerve inside the tooth and he can experience pain. When the nerve area becomes infected we will treat it with a root canal or removal of the tooth. An infected tooth can be very painful and in rare instances even life threatening. Something else to consider is his gum health. Without routine dental cleanings bacteria builds in the gums and causes inflammation. This is the body's immune system responding to that infection and has an effect on overall health. Read more...
Tooth loss to death. Dental decay (cavities) can cause mild to severe complications. Tooth pain , jaw pain, sinus pain. Tooth loss, loss of adjacent teeth as well. If an infection develops (an abcess), teeth can be lost. If an abcess occurs in an upper back tooth, it can drain to the cavernous sinus and lead to an infection in the brain, causing death if untreated. Procrastination will lead to more dollars spent. Read more...
Very sick, even die. An untreated cavity can get into the pulp or "nerve" of a tooth. That allows mouth bacteria a place to grow and even penetrate into ones jaw bone. That infection can stay static, get into the blood stream and attack your organs or even your heart or you can get a swelling that can obstruct your airway and even make breathing impossible! affiliated with a hospital, i see patients like this weekly! Read more...

How to prevent dental cavities on my 5 yr old son?

Decay. Monitor closely. Eliminate soda, sugar products, brush after every meal, have Fluoride drops or lozenge if not in your water, regular check-ups at the dentist with Fluoride treatments. Read more...
Brush his teeth. You still have to brush his teeth for him, but also let him do it and make sure he is doing it properly, good oral hygiene habits start young. Also if he can rinse and spit, you can use a Fluoride rinse before he goes to sleep, like act. Read more...
Good oral habits . And dental check up every 6 months to a year. Oftentimes kids do not like anything in their mouths. Make it fun, use battery operated toothbrushes with their favorite character or just plain ones should do. You still have to brush his teeth and let him do it by himself at the end and guide him. Kids get easily frustrated w failures , so make it easy for him. Make it fun! Read more...
Early screening. The best prevention starts at home. To get a cavity you need 3 things. 1) fermentable carbohydrates 2) specific bacteria 3) the tooth must be susceptible. Monitor your son. Instill good habits. Go to the dentist yourself to set a good example. Get your child to a good local dentist or pedodontist to show him that he does not have to be afraid. I cannot stress this last part enough. Read more...

How would you explain the mechanism responsible for the formation of dental cavities by resident microorganisms?

Bacterial acids. Bacteria on the tooth surface are living organisms. They eat and excrete. Their excretions are acids which remove the calcium from the tooth. This leaves behind the collagen fibers, or proteins, which the bacteria can now "eat" and viola- you've got a hole in your tooth! Read more...
Demineralization. The acids excreted by the bacteria dissolve the mineral matrix of the enamel which causes it to soften, resulting in decay. Read more...