What dental procedures are okay to have when I am pregnant?

Pregnancy Dental Work. Pregnancy dental work. Dental work such as cavity fillings and crowns should be treated to reduce the chance of infection. If dental work is done during pregnancy, the second trimester is ideal. Once you reach the third trimester, it may be very difficult to lie on your back for an extended period of time. The safest course of action is to postpone all unnecessary dental work until after the birth. However, sometimes emergency dental work such as a root canal or tooth extraction is necessary. Elective treatments, such as teeth whitening and other cosmetic procedures, should be postponed until after the birth. It is best to avoid exposing the developing baby to any risks, even if they are minimal.
Pregnancy Dental Work. Dental work such as cavity fillings and crowns should be treated to reduce the chance of infection. If dental work is done during pregnancy, the second trimester is ideal. Once you reach the third trimester, it may be very difficult to lie on your back for an extended period of time. The safest course of action is to postpone all unnecessary dental work until after the birth. However, sometimes emergency dental work such as a root canal or tooth extraction is necessary. Elective treatments, such as teeth whitening and other cosmetic procedures, should be postponed until after the birth. It is best to avoid exposing the developing baby to any risks, even if they are minimal.
Good question. You can get your teeth cleaned at any time and please do. This is better for your long term health. You probably want to put off any elective procedures until after the baby is born. If you must have something done, the best time is the 2nd trimester.
Cracked Tooth Syndrome... Cracked tooth syndrome is a dental condition characterized by symptoms of sharp pain on chewing without any visible reason, which is actually caused by a ‘hidden’ crack of the tooth. Teeth that cause cracked tooth syndrome usually have fractures that are too small to be seen on x-rays. Sometimes the fracture is below the gum line, making it even more difficult to identify. Cracked tooth syndrome is a condition that has to be identified and treated early enough before the damage puts the tooth at risk. If the crack reaches the pulp chamber of the cracked tooth, the pulp tissue becomes exposed to bacteria and bacterial toxins, and gets inflamed developing a tooth infection. An untreated cracked tooth can result in pulpal necrosis (death of the nerve), and tooth abscess (infection) requiring root canal treatment. In severe cases the tooth can split in two reducing the chances to fix the cracked tooth and usually tooth extraction is necessary.
Pregnancy Dental Work. Dental work such as cavity fillings and crowns should be treated to reduce the chance of infection. If dental work is done during pregnancy, the second trimester is ideal. Once you reach the third trimester, it may be very difficult to lie on your back for an extended period of time. The safest course of action is to postpone all unnecessary dental work until after the birth. However, sometimes emergency dental work such as a root canal or tooth extraction is necessary. Elective treatments, such as teeth whitening and other cosmetic procedures, should be postponed until after the birth. It is best to avoid exposing the developing baby to any risks, even if they are minimal.
All Safe. The only contraindications for dental work during pregnancy is the use of nitrous oxide. It is recommended that you have the procedures completed during your second trimester.
Trench Mouth.... Trench mouth is a severe form of gingivitis that causes painful, infected, bleeding gums and ulcerations. Although trench mouth is rare today in developed nations, it's common in developing countries that have poor nutrition and poor living conditions. Trench mouth is formally known as vincent's stomatitis, acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (anug) and necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (nug). Trench mouth earned its nickname because of its prevalence among soldiers who were stuck in the trenches during world war I without the means to take care of their teeth properly.
2nd trimester. Generally elective dental work should be done during the second trimester. Because the tissues are developing during the critical first trimester, only emergency procedures should be done. The third trimester is save too, but may not be comfortable for the patient during th eninth month to sit for a long time in the dental chair.
Oral Cancer Symptoms.... Common symptoms of oral cancer include: patches inside your mouth or on your lips that are white, a mixture of red and white, or red white patches (leukoplakia) are the most common. White patches sometimes become malignant. Mixed red and white patches (erythroleukoplakia) are more likely than white patches to become malignant. Red patches (erythroplakia) are brightly colored, smooth areas that often become malignant. A sore on your lip or in your mouth that won't heal bleeding in your mouth loose teeth difficulty or pain when swallowing difficulty wearing dentures a lump in your neck an earache.
Gums are... The tissue that surrounds the necks of teeth and covers the alveolar parts of the jaws.
Salivary Gland Infection.... Salivary gland infections are somewhat common, and they can return in some people. Viral infections such as mumps often affect the salivary glands (mumps most often causes parotiditis). Mumps is a rare infection today because of immunization with the MMR vaccine. Bacterial infections usually result from a blockage (such as salivary duct stones) or poor oral hygiene. They can be seen in people who are dehydrated and in the hospital.
Teeth Clenching... Teeth clenching or grinding is generally attributed to stress. If you can relieve stress or figure out what is causing the stress you may be able to relieve the grinding or clenching but not always.