How long do I need to take immunosuppression after a kidney transplant operation?

While Kidney Works. The transplanted kidney is made of genetically different "stuff" than you. This will never change. Your immune system won't get used to the kidney - although this is a dream we may some day accomplish with newer medications/treatments. With the tools/drugs currently available you must plan/accept the need to continuously take immunosuppression unless the kidney fails - which we hope won't happen.
Always. For the life of the graft. There are some research studies looking at a few patients that may be able to wean off their drugs if they have certain metabolic characteristists, but it is not advised.
Forever!!! Stopping or altering your immunosuppression on your own can put your organ at risk and you will likely end up dead or back on dialysis. The is a lot of research aimed at eliminating immunosuppression but the goal has not yet been reliably achieved.

Related Questions

How long would someone be on immunosuppression meds after kidney transplant?

For life. A successful transplant can have the dose of drugs reduced over time, perhaps some of them discontinued, but even the best matched organs will need continued immunosupression. Identical twin transplants, which are rare may be an exception. Read more...
Forever. If you stop immunosuppression the kidney will reject. Therefore you will need to stay on medication indefinitely. Read more...
Life long. Some immmunospression is needed as long as the graft is working. Read more...

What would happen if I would stop my immunosuppression medication after my kidney transplant?

Not a good idea. Immunosuppressants are suppressing your body immunity cells that can damage the transplanted kidney. When foreign substances enter our body, our body immunity cells try to kill them. Your Transplant kidney is compatible with your body but is still a foreign body. Stopping immunosuppressants is removing the life jacket in the middle of ocean- for an instance. Not a good idea. . Read more...
Immuno suppressant. Immuno suppressant medication prevent body from recognising transplanted kidney as foreign body . If these are stopped there is high probability of body rejecting the transplanted organ , kidney in your case. Not a good idea to change any medication without consulting your specialist or GP. Read more...
Why would you ? That would be the perfect recipe for disaster. A clear transplant rejection is highly likely! Read more...
Rejection. If immunosuppressants are stopped there is a strong possibility that your transplant will be rejected and you will become very sick. If you are not tolerating the medicines you should speak to your doctor for an adjustment of medication. Read more...

What do doctors consider when looking at the amount of immune suppression drugs used for a kidney transplant patient?

Several things. Immunosuppression with medications are essential for optimal functioning of kidney transplant. There are several serious side effects due to these medications. Doctors look for any occult infections, liver function, kidney function, blood counts, none marrow activity etc. Read more...
Many Considerations. There are many issues that can affect the amount of immunosuppression given to a recipient. The relationship between the donor and the recipient, the specific donor kidney source, the age of the recipient, the liver and bone marrow function, prior use of immunosuppressive drugs, prior cancer or infections, are just some of the medical variables that play a role. Read more...
Risk vs. Benefit. Since you don't come with dials for us to read to tell us how suppressed your immune system is, we use clues to interpret what is really happening. Indications that your system is too suppressed are infections and cancers. Too little suppression allows rejection to happen. We start your regimen based on factors such as how different you + the donor are, + how vulnerable to rejection the organ is. Read more...

How long is a kidney transplant operation?

About 90 minutes. Transplants in young, thin recipients with no vascular disease can take less than an hour. More complicated procedures may take as long as 2 hours. Operations in teaching hospitals can take considerably longer in order to maintain a reasonable degree of safety. There is a wide range in the speed and skill of transplant surgeons and this should be considered when choosing a transplant center. Read more...
Usually 3-6 hrs. Factors determining the length include the technical issues, the anesthesia care (going to sleep + waking up), + equipment issues (example is changing a blown out light bulb - surgeons have to be able to see what they are doing!). A kidney txp requires 3 connections - artery, vein + ureter. If the pt is obese, has arterial disease, prior txps, or the kidney has unusual anatomy, it may take longer. Read more...
Depends. It can vary depending on the size of the recipient, variable anatomy of the kidney (multiple arteries or ureters etc.), previous surgery in the recipient, or other unusual surgical findings. Most cases take 3-5 hours. Read more...