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How does azathioprine work after a renal transplantation?

4 doctors weighed in
2 doctors agree

In brief: OK, but not great

Azathioprine (aza) was the mainstay of drug therapy from the early 1960's to the early 1980's.
It works primarily by preventing t-cells from getting excited, multiplying, and attacking the graft. One-year graft survival using aza was approximately 50% while more modern drugs used today result in 95% survival.

In brief: OK, but not great

Azathioprine (aza) was the mainstay of drug therapy from the early 1960's to the early 1980's.
It works primarily by preventing t-cells from getting excited, multiplying, and attacking the graft. One-year graft survival using aza was approximately 50% while more modern drugs used today result in 95% survival.
Dr. Barry Browne
Dr. Barry Browne
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In brief: Blocks Rejection

Azathioprine is called an anti-proliferative drug because it places a false building block for dna (6-mercaptopurine) in the path of dividing cells.
It can prevent rejection of the transplant by preventing the rapid expansion of lymphocytes in the body that are needed to reject the kidney.

In brief: Blocks Rejection

Azathioprine is called an anti-proliferative drug because it places a false building block for dna (6-mercaptopurine) in the path of dividing cells.
It can prevent rejection of the transplant by preventing the rapid expansion of lymphocytes in the body that are needed to reject the kidney.
Dr. Stuart Flechner
Dr. Stuart Flechner
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