4 doctors weighed in:

When having a brain aneurysm, do blood vessels become 100% occluded?

4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Douglas Arenberg
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care
1 doctor agrees

In brief: No

An aneurysm is an abnormal dilation or bulging of the wall of the blood vessel.
If that dilated segment becomes very fragile and thin it can rupture due to the pressure of the blood and bleeding occurs into the brain. This bleeding can cause spasm of surrounding vessels. But most of the vessels do not become "occluded".

In brief: No

An aneurysm is an abnormal dilation or bulging of the wall of the blood vessel.
If that dilated segment becomes very fragile and thin it can rupture due to the pressure of the blood and bleeding occurs into the brain. This bleeding can cause spasm of surrounding vessels. But most of the vessels do not become "occluded".
Dr. Douglas Arenberg
Dr. Douglas Arenberg
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Dr. John Garner
Internal Medicine - Cardiology

In brief: Rarely

Aneurysms do tend to cause occlusion by increasing turbulence promoting endothelial recruitment of platelets, but the primary concern is rupture of the aneurysm if it is large enough, not clot.

In brief: Rarely

Aneurysms do tend to cause occlusion by increasing turbulence promoting endothelial recruitment of platelets, but the primary concern is rupture of the aneurysm if it is large enough, not clot.
Dr. John Garner
Dr. John Garner
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In brief: No

Aneurysms are due to weakness in the vessels wall, usually at branch points of the vessel.
They are similar to blebs in the sidewall of a tire. The bleb grows under increasing pressure and on-going weakness of the wall. In an aneurysm, blood continues to flow, some entering the outpouched aneurysm and exiting, and some may clot along the wall. This latter event is seen in larger aneurysms>smaller.

In brief: No

Aneurysms are due to weakness in the vessels wall, usually at branch points of the vessel.
They are similar to blebs in the sidewall of a tire. The bleb grows under increasing pressure and on-going weakness of the wall. In an aneurysm, blood continues to flow, some entering the outpouched aneurysm and exiting, and some may clot along the wall. This latter event is seen in larger aneurysms>smaller.
Dr. Jonathan Dissin
Dr. Jonathan Dissin
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