What is angina, chest wall pain and a mild heart attack?

Angina. Angina is chest pain that occurs when there is a partial blockage of one of the coronary arteries. This is as opposed to heart attack when there is a near total occlusion.
Differences. Angina-chest pain from heart issue with ischemia low coronary flow and no permanent damage. Mild heart attack includes some damage to the heart in a localized area with ekg or cardiac cell death and enzyme release. Massive heart attack is more cells damaged- killed. Chest pain many causes from heart to lung to esophagus or the chest wall( ribs muscle, pleura etc)and more.

Related Questions

Out of angina, chest wall pain, and a mild heart attack, which one is the scariest to have?

SCARY? Depends on how scare you get when you may die of either. Read more...
Chest wall pain... Is usually benign and thus least dangerous. Angina is manifestation of heart disease, but occure before any damage or heart attack, therefore, the worst is mild heart attack which means mild damage has been done to the heart. Read more...

This morning had really bad chest wall pain. Only when I breathe in normally. Went away. Felt like a heart attack. Pain was 10/10. What could it be?

Heart attack. Lots of causes of chest wall pain, at 21 you are highly unlikely to be having a heart attack. It could be costochondritis, intercostal spasm, chest wall muscle, esophageal spasm, lots of things, stop smoking and if contnues see your doc. Read more...
Possible rib problem. Read more about it here http://www.Basicspine.Com/conditions-procedures/pain-management/slipped-rib-syndrome.Html could also be something wrong with the stomach, like an ulcer. I noticed you take advil (ibuprofen) and omeprazole..See your doctor for a physical exam. Read more...
Pleurisy. Sounds like pleurisy. Typically transient but very painful with taking deep breaths. Read more...

Does angina usually follow a heart attack? I'm a male in his 40's who had a mild heart attack a few months ago. Ever since I have been having frequent to infrequent angina attacks. Is this normal following a mild heart attack?

It . It depends on how much atherosclerosis you have, how your heart attack was treated, your current medication regimen, and how active you are. You should tell your doctor about the circumstances surrounding your angina attacks, so he/she can determine whether you are adequately treated or whether more needs to be done. Angina occurs when there is reduced blood flow to the heart muscle during increased stress or activity. Some angina might be expected after a heart attack, particularly if you have lots of atherosclerosis and are fairly active. On the other hand, if your angina is provoked easily or even at rest, this is concerning and you should be evaluated immediately. Keep in mind that angina can also improve or completely resolve as time passes and the heart develops new blood vessels called 'collaterals.'. Read more...