Why do I experience low back pain when I work out my legs?

It may be related . To the position you are in or the load your back may be sustaining during the workout or both. You may want to try modifying or changing your exercise routine and if no better, see a physiatrist for an evaluation and recommendation .

Related Questions

Low back pain and leg tingling?

It depends. Tough question. Pain in lower back and tingling in the legs may or may not be related. You should see your doctor to have it evaluated, especially if this is a new symptom. If you have any changes in your bowel or bladder function, it is more of an emergency. Read more...
See a Doc. Could be a nerve root irritation in your back. See your doctor . Read more...
Pinched Nerve. Low back pain going down the leg sounds like sciatica. This occurs when one of your lumbar spinal nerves is irritated. This can often improve on it's own, but if pain lasts greater than 2 weeks see your physician. There are many non-surgical options. Read more...

Low back pain and leg tingling at gym?

See a Doc. The first thing to do is to try to determine what activity brought about these symptoms. You really need to think hard about this. If you can identify what brought it about, then it may be helpful to speak to a personal trainer to see if you are using poor technique or if there is an activity that you are "overdoing". If the symptoms persist, probably best to see your doc or a back specialist. Read more...
Sciatica. Sounds like possibly sciatica. Seek treatment from pcp, orthopod or neurology. Can often be treated with therapy. Read more...

I have low back pain my knee and leg are cold what could be wrong?

Sciatica. Sciatica, or in medical terms lumbosacral radiculopathy, is commonly associated with differences in temperature to the affected extremity. Not all patients will complain of noticeable weakness, sensory loss or shooting pain. A good physical exam will usually confirm the diagnosis, however. The good news is this condition is usually quite treatable. Read more...
PAD. A cool leg to touch, not "feels cool, " implies a problem with blood flow. This may be your first indication of peripheral arterial disease. If accompanied by pain that is worsening, get to the er. Otherwise, consider taking an Aspirin a day and be seen asap by your doc or a vascular surgeon. If this is just a sensation of cold, then a nerve may be compressed. That is not an emergency. Read more...

I have sudden onset low back pain with radiation of pain down the leg, no injury. What's causing this?

Disk perhaps. A common cause would be a disk herniation (rupture, slip) in the low back. It can also be caused by nerve irritation by bone spurs in the low back. Less commonly, disk injury without herniation can also cause this type of symptoms. Often such problems will improve with time. Seek help if you have problems emptying your bladder or you have weakness in the leg muscles. Read more...
Pinched nerve. People often develop a pinched nerve in their back or neck for no reason. They often wake up with the symptoms and this is usually due to a bulging or herniated disc and is more common in younger folks. See a doctor if the pain is severe or you have weakness/numbness or bowel/bladder problems. You may need MRI if not better soon. Read more...

I've been having really bad low back pain recently with sharp pain down back of left leg, specifically when bending over, lifting, or coughing.?

See a doctor. This could be a disc herniation in the back. This could cause the symptoms that you are describing. Luckily, if it is a disc herniation, surgery may not be necessary but i would suggest you get this checked out. Read more...
Siatica. That's a classic description of siatica most common cause herniated intervertebral disc see primary or wait if the pain is not severe and livable. Read more...
Many Possibilities. Depending on how long it's been going on, i would consider an evaluation by a pain/spine specialist. Sometimes it could be a muscle imbalance, early onset arthritis or scoliosis. Also could be a pinched nerve/herniated disc. Either way it might be good to figure it out and get appropriate treatment. Read more...
This is most . consistent with a disc source of nerve compression or irritation although there can be other possibilities. The fact that you can increase the pain with bending & lifting & worsen the pain with coughing most likely to find a disc problem like a herniation or tear of the outer portion of the disc known as an annular tear. These can be treated non operatively 90% of the time. Start with your doctor. Read more...