3 doctors weighed in:

Is it possible for muscles around the knee to be trained to be strong enough to compensate for a torn acl?

3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Bernard Bach Jr
Orthopedic Surgery

In brief: It's possible.

You could try that route.
Generally speaking, only those who modify their activities, may be able to function fairly well with a torn ACL. At your age, you should probably have it surgically repaired.

In brief: It's possible.

You could try that route.
Generally speaking, only those who modify their activities, may be able to function fairly well with a torn ACL. At your age, you should probably have it surgically repaired.
Dr. Bernard Bach Jr
Dr. Bernard Bach Jr
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Dr. Barry Waldman
Orthopedic Surgery - Reconstruction

In brief: Yes

But it is rarely as good as an ACL reconstruction.
Patients are usually happier with surgery.

In brief: Yes

But it is rarely as good as an ACL reconstruction.
Patients are usually happier with surgery.
Dr. Barry Waldman
Dr. Barry Waldman
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Dr. John Ayres
Orthopedic Surgery

In brief: No

The ACL is the primary restraint that prevents the shin bone (tibia) from sliding forward from beneath the thigh bone (femur).
When the ACL is torn you develop unwanted pathologic anterior knee instability. The hamstrings are the secondary restraints. Strengthening them will minimize but not eliminate anterior knee instability following an ACL tear.

In brief: No

The ACL is the primary restraint that prevents the shin bone (tibia) from sliding forward from beneath the thigh bone (femur).
When the ACL is torn you develop unwanted pathologic anterior knee instability. The hamstrings are the secondary restraints. Strengthening them will minimize but not eliminate anterior knee instability following an ACL tear.
Dr. John Ayres
Dr. John Ayres
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