Can a pet scan light up with an infection (lung nodule)?

Yes. Iflammation, sarcoid and of course cancer will show up on a pet/ct.
Yes. Infectious, inflammatory, and malignant conditions can all light up on PET scan. There is overlap between SUV's in these conditions so there is no exact number where one can have a threshold between benign and malignant. If PET is negative, this usually means the nodule can be watched closely and no immediate biopsy is usually needed. CT characteristics of the nodule can also be helpful.
Yes. Pet scans pick up cancer or inflammation. Many acute infections will light up pet, but the suv characteristics and the appearance of the nodule help the radiologists. Still.. Pet is not a perfect test and there may be uncertainty. Sometimes a biopsy is required to make a diagnosis.
Yes. Pet scan identifies increased cellular metabolism. The suv is a measure of how metabolically active the nodule is. It does not diagnose the cause of the increased metabolism. Inflammation from any cause, including infection stimulates increased metabolism. It is important any lung nodule be thoroughly investigated and closely followed by a comprehensive thoracic team.

Related Questions

What is the lowest intake suv on a pet scan (lung nodule)?

None. In general, any suv below 2.5 is considered not malignant, however one has to be careful as several factors affect suv, like the size of the lesion, also there is a lot of variability in suv among different machines and depends also on the dose injected. Read more...
Lung background. I think that you are asking what is the lowest suv value that a lung nodule could have? Or when is a lung nodule suspicious? We usually use the lung background as reference for lung nodules. Lung background is very low and often 1-.5 or below. If the metabolic activity on a nodule stands out as compared to background (e.g. Suv above background), follow-up pet/ct is recommended to ensure resolution. Read more...
Zero. The lowest suv (standardized uptake value - a semiquantitative measure of metabolism) is zero. The maximum suv in a region of interest is called suv max. Generally, if the lung nodule is less than an suv max of 1, it is likely benign. However, there are plenty of non malignant diseases that can have increased FDG uptake, such as healing fungal lung infections, called granulomas. Read more...

Can there be a difference in a CT and pet scan of 1mm in the results of a lung nodule?

Yes. A 1 mm difference in the size of a lesion imaged by two different scans (or even in 2 sequential scans done by the same machine) is usually of no significance. You have to put it all in the context of clinical condition, presence of other lesions, and change over time. Read more...
Yes and no. The difference may not be real because the lung and the nodule are three-dimensional structures and ct and pet are two-dimensional and it depends which way the sections are made, which is never the same depending on how you are positioned in the scanner. Read more...
Absolutely. Ct scans and pet scans cut the body into slices of variable thickness (usually 2-5 mm), so it is definitely possible to cut through a different portion of the nodule on two scans - even if performed on the same day. Read more...
Yes. There are differences in techniques between the ct scan with a pet scan and a general ct scan. Additionally, radiologists may measure a nodule slightly differently. Please look at a ruler and realize just how small 1 mm is. Radiologists routinely are measuring things less than 1 cm or about 3/8 of an inch. Read more...

Is this too much in a 2 month period, 1 pet scan, I ct, 6 x-rays, a brain scan now doctors wants another pet. Lung nodule 1.4 -2.7 suv?

Need vs safety. The average background radiation exposure is a bout 2 msv (millisievert)/yr, and an average pet scan uses 5-7, ct=6.5-8, chest xray=0.02, and an aircrew member 4-9/yr, for comparison. It is hard to tell how many pet can be safely done--if you need it and the benefit outweights the risk, it does not matter how many. Talk to your doc/oncologist/radiologist--they know your case best. Good luck. Read more...
Probably not. I'm sure the doctors who are seeing you have very good reasons to want to re-evaluate your nodule, and it seems quite reasonable. They probably want to be aggressive and detect any change as early as possible. Read more...
Probably not. I would worry much more about the lung nodule than i would the quantity of scans. Read more...

Had an MRI of a lung nodule that is non calcified. .. Slow growing since 2001... 9mm... Radiologist made diagnoses of it being benign. How can he make such a diagnoses without truly knowing isn't a CT pet scan better to show or even a biopsy?

None of the above. Kind of confusing story. We don't usually do an MRI of the lung to get that answer. Was it a ct scan? There are only three ways we can prove a nodule is benign, each with its pluses and minuses. One is a clear radiographic appearance (calcium or fat within the nodule), two is to demonstrate the absence of growth over sufficient time, and three is take it out. Read more...
D/w your MD. It looks like a benign tumor--over 11 years- it grows slowly and the size is only 9mm. If this were a cancer, the growth will be way more rapid than this is. A pet scan has some degree of false negativity when the size is < 10mm. A biopsy is invasive and it's not easy to do when the size is small. Would recommend surveillance only, & quit smoking .If you smoke. (btw, ct scan is better than mri). Read more...
See below. This may be an intrapulmonary lymph node and not a tumor at all. Radiologist probably made diagnosis based on the fact that it is very small and relatively stable over 11 years. Growth is very difficult to gauge with spots of that size. At any rate, it is too small for a meaningful pet or a biopsy. A ct is always better than a MRI for lung problems. Good luck! Read more...
Very slow growth. Perhaps the growth is so slow as to make malignancy unlikely. Discuss the specifics with your doctor. It is always better to compare same modalities (ct with ct). Ct is better than MRI for evaluating the lungs because of quicker scan time. Pet/ct can be nondiagnostic at this size. Biopsy has its own risks and is harder at this size. Read more...
Choices. 12 years with minimal change suggests benign may still calcify inflammatory- granulomas can change a bit also removal is always an option but we try to, weigh risk versus benefit. Ct is good for regular followup. Pet can be positive with some inflammation, but a negative would be encouraging. Read more...