6 doctors weighed in:

I have calcification in my rotator cuff. What should I be doing. I have been put on a nsaid ?

6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Brian Badman
Orthopedic Surgery
2 doctors agree

In brief: Inject or surgery

Calcific tendonitis is an inflammatory tendonopathy seen in a small number of individuals.
These people get calcium deposited in tendons and it can be very painful. Oral nsaids probably won't do much. I would be more inclined to start with a corticosteroid injection and see if diminishes. Occasionally surgical decompression may be necessary with repair of the defect if pain persists.

In brief: Inject or surgery

Calcific tendonitis is an inflammatory tendonopathy seen in a small number of individuals.
These people get calcium deposited in tendons and it can be very painful. Oral nsaids probably won't do much. I would be more inclined to start with a corticosteroid injection and see if diminishes. Occasionally surgical decompression may be necessary with repair of the defect if pain persists.
Dr. Brian Badman
Dr. Brian Badman
Thank
Dr. Charles Toman
Sports Medicine

In brief: Try...

Some physical therapy and potentially an injection.
If pain persists you may need an MRI to evaluate the integrity of the tendon. Often, calcification signifies the body's failed attempt at appropriate healing. Thank you.

In brief: Try...

Some physical therapy and potentially an injection.
If pain persists you may need an MRI to evaluate the integrity of the tendon. Often, calcification signifies the body's failed attempt at appropriate healing. Thank you.
Dr. Charles Toman
Dr. Charles Toman
Thank
Dr. John Michalski
Orthopedic Surgery

In brief: Calcific tendonitis

Likely sign of chronic injury/tearing.
Start conservatively with exercises, pt, ice, heat, nsaids, possible injection, etc.

In brief: Calcific tendonitis

Likely sign of chronic injury/tearing.
Start conservatively with exercises, pt, ice, heat, nsaids, possible injection, etc.
Dr. John Michalski
Dr. John Michalski
Thank
Dr. Allen Lu
Orthopedic Surgery

In brief: Nothing yet

The calcium deposits are a reflection of inflammation in the rotator cuff tendon.
By themselves they do not cause pain or harm. We mostly leave them alone. There are cases where tears occur around the calcium deposits, which may require repair.

In brief: Nothing yet

The calcium deposits are a reflection of inflammation in the rotator cuff tendon.
By themselves they do not cause pain or harm. We mostly leave them alone. There are cases where tears occur around the calcium deposits, which may require repair.
Dr. Allen Lu
Dr. Allen Lu
Thank
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