Is a crown always required after root canal treatment?

No. A crown is not always required after a root canal. After a root canal, a tooth becomes more brittle and more likely to break. A crown helps prevent the tooth from breaking. If you decide not to get a crown placed on the tooth then you are taking a chance of losing that tooth although you spent the time and money doing the root canal. Take your dentist's advise.
Depends. If a molar or chewing tooth needs a root canal because of extensive decay or large filling then it should always be crowned. If any tooth that gets a root canal has sufficient supporting tooth structure a crown may not be needed. Your dentist will be able to determine what is best for any tooth that gets a root canal.
Most of the time. The root canal procedure removes the tooth's primary source of nutrition and moisture, the pulp. As a result posterior teeth generally require a crown in most cases to help reinforce the tooth. Sometimes a very conservative access hole can be made to treat front teeth, a crown may not be necessary.
No. It is dependent upon how much tooth structure remains after removal of tooth decay and the root canal procedure. Molar or back teeth may require crown placement as chewing forces can cause repeated stress to the tooth structure resulting in fracture. If one or more walls of the tooth have been removed then a crown may be indicated. Consult your dentist for the optimum long term treatment options.

Related Questions

What is crowning? Normally those that did root canal treatment did the crowning also. Does it permanently stick to teeth?

Tooth Covering. A crown, also referred to as a cap, is a covering that is placed over a tooth. Crowns are placed to protect a tooth from failure, such as breaking, or to replace parts of a missing tooth. A crown is permanently cemented to the tooth. If the crown falls off it can easily be recemented by a dentist. Read more...
Protective cover. A crown is a durable cap that veneers and gives strength to teeth that have been weakened by decay or fracture. It is permanently cemented to the tooth, but can still fail if not cared for. If you had a root canal by your general dentist, he or she will likely place a crown after. If an endodontist (specialist) did your root canal, you will be referred back to your general dentist for the crown. Read more...
Tooth Covering. A crown is a permanent covering that fits over an original tooth that is either decayed, damaged or cracked. Crowns are made of a variety of different materials such as porcelain, gold, acrylic resin or a mix of these materials. Porcelain generally has the most natural appearance, your dentist will decide which material is best to use. Read more...

Anyone know the cost for root canal treatment including crown in malaysia?

Not a good place . Do not have dental treatment in malaysia! you will just have to have it re-treated in the states. Pay the price here! you will save money and your health in the long run. Read more...
Don't do this. Don't even think of doing this. You have no way to know what materials are being used, whether they are safe or how qualified the individual treating you is. If the concern behind the question is financial, consider having treatment in a dental school in the us where treatment will be supervised and certain standards will be met. Read more...

Do people ever get a proper root canal treatment without having a crown placed?

Crowns & Root Canals. When a tooth has a root canal treatment, the diseased nerve tissue which had previously provided internal lubrication to the tooth, is removed and replaced with a cement filling. As a result of loss of the internal moisture the tooth becomes brittle. Typically a tooth that has undergone root canal has lost a lot of tooth structure and is heavily stressed. A crown is the best protection for it. Read more...
Yes but it depends.. If there is not much tooth structure missing beyond the root canal entry point and if there is no decay within the tooth structure, then it is possible to not need a crown. However, i would recommend all crowns be placed within a reasonable period of time if indicated. Without crowns some of these root canal treated teeth can crack or break. I would definitely crown molar teeth. Read more...
Yes but. In the vast majority of cases, it is better to safeguard the tooth against breakage and further decay by having a crown placed within in a reasonable time. More often than not, patients end up, some time in the future, being sorry that they did not head their dentist's advice regarding this issue. You have spent a lot of money and time having rct and it's best to protect that investment. Read more...

Can a crown/cap be placed on the molar without root canal treatment?

Yes. Not all crowned teeth need to have a root canal prior to crown placement. However, it is usually wise to place a crown on a molar tooth that has had a root canal to protect it from fracture. Read more...
Sure can. Not all teeth need both. Most teeth that have had a root canal need a crown but not all. There are a lot more teeth that need crowns and not root canals though. Read more...

I just had root canal treatment this april 7, 2015 but not yet put crown on it. Now, mu tooth feel sensitivity to cold and sensitivity goes on root?

Root canal. If you had a root canal completed, then the nerve inside the root that allows you to feel temperature changes has been removed and it's unlikely the sensitivity to cold is coming from the same tooth. However, the root canal treated tooth can be sensitive to pressure or biting or be sore. Read more...

Almost done with a root canal treatment. Just need filling and crown. But bite is off and tooth feels like it has moved/shifted. Is this normal?

Root canal. Are you having any pain or swelling? Talk to the dentist doing the root canal. It maybe something as simple as a temporary filling that is too high and needs a simple adjustment, or it could be an infection. See the dentist. Read more...
It is temporary. Your tooth will be properly restored with final restoration It is extremely important in ensuring long-term success. Take care. Read more...

I had my root canal treatment on front tooth last april 7, 2015 but not yet put crown. To my surprise, it feels sensitivity to cold now and cant use to bite because it pains. Is it normal? What should I do?

No. It is not expected to have cold sensitivity because cold sensitivity is a sign that the tooth is still alive, and after a root canal a tooth should not have any nerve left and thus will be considered dead. It is possible that the cold sensitivity you are feeling is from one of the teeth next to it or that the root canal was not finished, I recommend going back to your dentist to check it out. Read more...
Call dentist. Have the dentist do a clinical examination in addition to taking an x-ray. Hopefully, the tooth is not fractured. Perhaps, it is referred pain from an adjacent tooth. Many times. if the access is small enough, anterior teeth can get away with a small restoration rather than a crown. Discuss with your dentist. Read more...
See your dentist. A tooth that has had root canal treatment will not feel temperature such as hot or cold. If you are still unable to bite on the tooth, that is also problematic. I would advise you to return to your dentist to be evaluated and you might need to see an Endodontist for further evaluation of your symptoms. Read more...
It is not normal. After a root canal the tooth should not be sensitive to hot or cold, but it's not unusual for your tooth to be sensitive to biting. If this persists after a few weeks you should contact your dentist. Read more...
Poss. another tooth. You may have an issue with another tooth right next to the root canaled tooth...we see this quite often. Have the dentist check for you. Easy to discern and treat. Read more...

Does horizontal bone loss around tooth always require root canal treatment?

No. Horizontal bone loss is a periodontal or gum problem. That is not treated with "root canals". You should see a dentist or periodontist to determine why you are losing bone. Read more...
No. Bone loss leading to the need for a root canal can be horizontal or vertical. However, I have seen many teeth with bone loss that do not require ednodontics. Consult an endodontist for your particular needs. Read more...
No. Generally, only if sensitivity is too much to tolerate. If tooth is vital and intact, without any symptoms, then no need for root canal treatment. Read more...
Rare, but can. Happen. I have seen a few periodontal support problems expose uniquely "high cervical" lateral accessory canals in a root and allow bacteria to invade the root canal spaces. Root canal required and sometimes surg. I have also had patients develop excessive pain/ discomfort from bone loss/root exposure and a root canal can be employed to control the pain. Remember, theses are rare situations. Read more...