Can mammograms detect all types of breast cancer?

Yes. Yes, however, it depends on your breast density. The more dense your breast tissue is, the increased possibility that a mass may not be seen.
Yes. All types of breast cancer are potentially detectable mammographically, although some types(e.g. lobular carcinoma) are more difficult to detect than others.
Most of them. A mammogram is the screening imaging study of choice for women over 40 years old. Mammogram can pick up about 85-90% of breast cancers. In particular it can pick up many breast cancers before being palpable. Some invasive lobular cancers may be harder to be picked up. However, the mammogram is intended for detection of all breast cancers. Digital technique has ehanced the mammogram quality.

Related Questions

How does breast cancer appear like on a mammogram?

Density or Ca++. Mammograms will often detect areas that are more dense than normal breast tissue or that have little flecks of calcium within milk ducts. These may be categorized based on risk, with those that are deemed suspicious warranting a biopsy. Of those abnormalities that are biopsy-worthy, about 15-30% end up being cancerous. Read more...
Crab like mass. Irregular, with multiple crab like projection. Read more...
Quite variable. Breast cancer can appear as a spiculated mass, cluster of tiny calcifications, smoothly marginated mass, area of subtle distortion or be invisible on mammogram. Some tumors are only seen on ultrasound and a few are only felt by you or your doctor. The point is that the appearance of tumors on mammogram is quite variable. Read more...
Multiple ways. Breast cancers can have multiple appearances: round mass, irregular mass, asymmetry, distortion of normal architecture, microcalcifications, skin thickening, nipple retraction, skin retraction, abnormal lymph node. . Read more...

How do you check breast cancer other than mammogram?

See list. For diagnosis: physical examination ultrasound breast mri needle biopsy excisional biopsy for staging: pet/ct scan sentinnel lymph node biopsy lumpectomy mastectomy axillary node dissection for follow-up: usually physical examination, and mammogram or mri. Read more...
Checking for cancer. Physical examination by your doctor, and self exam, augment the screening mammogram in most circumstances. There may be an emerging role for screening ultrasound in dense breasts. Breast MRI is also useful in particular cases. Read more...

How can they detect breast cancer without a mammogram?

Other tests. A breast ultrasound (us) can be used but the ultimate way to make a diagnosis is to get a needle biopsy. Mammograms are not usually done in women under 40 because of the dense breast tissue. If you have a concern, i recommend you go to a breast center to see a breast surgeon or speak with your gynecologist. Read more...
Cancer detection. Breast cancer can be detected in other ways, although mammography is the standard of care screening imaging exam. Speak with your doctor. Self exam, physical exam by your doctor, breast ultrasound and breast MRI can all detect potential cancers. They are complementary exams and one or more can be useful in the appropriate context. Definitive diagnosis requires biopsy. Read more...

Could a mammogram before 40 increase risk for breast cancer?

Good point. Risk of radiation induced breast cancer is probably negligible, compared to benefits of mammography. But you should undergo any test only when it is medically indicated, because every diagnostic test has its risks as well as benefits. Read more...
Radiation . Every X-ray, mammograms included, causes a very slight increased risk of radiation induced cancer. For mammo and other diagnostic studies, the benefit far outweighs the minimal risk. Read more...

Is a mammogram the most effective way to detect breast cancer?

Mammogram. Mammogram is effective but, there are other procedures may give a better results such as mri. Read more...
To screen . It is the most effective way to screen for breast cancer. It is easy to do, it is cheap, it can be done anywhere. It is not the most sensitive nor the perfect tool however. Thus, it is always advised to combine modalities- breast exam, mammogram-and if there is a suspicion- combining mammo and sono and/or MRI will be more sensitive to detect breast cancer. Ultimately biopsy is to confirm of cance. Read more...
Yes but... It is currently the most cost effective and scientifically validated method we have to screen large populations. In particular situations, MRI and/or ultrasound may be useful. MRI is the most sensitive modality for detecting cancer, but long term outcome data is not available, it suffers from too many false positives, it is expensive, time consuming, and not widely available. Read more...

Can men get mammograms and if not how do they know they have breast cancer?

Yes. Breast cancer in men is rare, but it happens. Men over 60 are more likely to get breast cancer. Because men have less breast tissue, they feel or see a lump. So men should feel their breasts regularly, especially older men. And yes, if there's a lump, men get a mammogram! but not screening mammograms...Only if there's a lump. Read more...
Men can. get mammograms. A small percentage of breast cancers occur in men, so if a man has a breast lump, a mammogram and/or ultrasound may be indicated. Read more...

When should young women go in for a mammogram done to detect for breast cancer?

Baseline age 35-40. There has been some debate on the utility of mammogram between age 40-50 however, the current recommendation is that after your baseline mammogram, yearly mammograms start at age 40. If you have a 1 st degree relative with breast cancer at a young age, then your mammograms start 10 years prior to their age at diagnosis. You should discuss the timing your with your doctor to decide what's best. Read more...
Mammograms. According to the American Cancer Society, American College of Radiology, and others, annual screening mammography should begin at age 40. Screening may begin sooner if you are a BRCA carrier or are otherwise at high risk. . Read more...