What are complications for someone with acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

Many side effects. There are many potential complications for somebody with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (all). Some are related to the leukemia and some are due to toxicities of the treatment. Typical problems include infection, bleeding problems, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, mouth sores, hair loss, fatigue, and need for blood transfusions. There can be effects on fertility as well.

Related Questions

I was wondering what are some complications that can happen with all (acute lymphoblastic leukemia)?

It is a wide open ?? Your oncologist is your best guide in this battle. This disease(all) behaves very differently between children and adults. So we need to know who has the all, is it a child or an adult? The disease has high cure potential yet it requires chemotherapy for its treatment and that means tons of potential complications which you doctor can inform you about. Read more...
Infection,shock,coma. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia invades the blood and can spread throughout the body to other organs, such as the liver, spleen, and lymph nodes. But it does not normally produce tumors as do many types of cancer. It is an acute type of leukemia, which means it can progress quickly. Without treatment, it can be fatal within a few months. Read more...

What is acute lymphoblastic leukemia (all)?

Lymph system cancer. Lymphocytes are normal cells of the immune system that protects the body from infection. When these cells become cancerous, they grow out of control in the bone marrow, blood and other organs. All is very common in children but can occur in adults. With children, it is truly one of our success stories thanks to clinical trials with cure rates above 90%. Adults do not do as well. Read more...
Blood cancer. All is a form of leukemia which in turn is a form of cancer, more specifically blood and bone marrow cancer. The word "acute" means it progresses faster, as opposed to chronic cases that usually have a slower progression. The word "lymphoblastic" means immature lymphoid and describes the type of malignant cell involved in this leukemia, as opposed to other types of cells, for example myeloid. Read more...
ALL. ALL is a type of leukemia that starts from white blood cells in the bone marrow, the soft inner part of bones. It develops from cells called lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell central to the immune system, or from lymphoblasts, an immature type of lymphocyte. ALL invades the blood and can spread throughout the body to other organs, such as the liver, spleen, and lymph nodes. Read more...

I have a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

ALL. I'm sorry to here about your child with all. Do you have a question? The cure rate of all has improved dramatically over the years and is one of the success stories in oncology fsupporting the rationale of continued research and iterative improvements in care. Read more...
Question please?? I'm sure you are under tremendous stress and have a million concerns. The next year is going to be very intense and require someone to be a 24 hour a day caretaker. There will be hospitalizations, procedures, pain and tears. The great news is that most types of ALL are now curable if you follow the oncologist's care plan exactly. Please ask friends, family, any support people to help out!! Read more...

Chances of curing acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults?

Survival rates.... In adults are not as good as they are in children, but they are improving with time. Indeed, many young adults are treated on pediatric protocols and or by peds oncologists, and this has shown to be of some benefit. Taking all comers, adults with all have approximately a 40% os, while for children this number is approximately 85%. Some subgroups of pediatric all have 95% survival. Read more...

What is the prognosis for a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

Good. Prognosis is good--all in children is very treatable with many successful outcomes. Read more...
Good. The treatment for allis very long but very good. There are different risk groups of all depending on many factors. The best of these have a prognosis of 95% cure rates. The common risk groups have 80-85%cure rates. Read more...

What are the chances of curing childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

Depends. On the staging, the age of the child and the genetics of it. Read more...
Good. . This disease is curable in 80% of cases. There are many findings of the leukemia that can effect the prognosis. Some findings make the curability higher, some make it lower. Overall, there are good treatments for this disease. Read more...
>80% While there are many variables that determine the answer to that exactly - things such as type of ALL, CNS involvement, etc - the prognosis for ALL is greater than 80% now. Some types even exceed 90%. A lot also depends on early recognition and level of care. It's a must that well trained and up-to-date pediatric oncologists are treating. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

The acute. Leukemias are those that are immediately life threatening if left untreated. The most common in children is the lymphoid t ype, ie arising from lymphocytes. In adults the myeloid type is more common. Read more...
See below. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (all) is a type of cancer of the blood. The cancerous cell in all is the lymphoblast. There are differ ENT types of lymphoblasts, which lead to different types of all (b cells, t cells, pre-b cells). This leukemia is called acute because it develops fairly rapidly (over several weeks). Read more...
ALL. ALL is a type of leukemia that starts from white blood cells in the bone marrow, the soft inner part of bones. It develops from cells called lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell central to the immune system, or from lymphoblasts, an immature type of lymphocyte. ALL invades the blood and can spread throughout the body to other organs, such as the liver, spleen, and lymph nodes. Read more...