Related Questions

If I have sickle cell trait but not disease will I need to do anything special on long flights?

No. It is always a good idea to get up and walk around a little bit on long flights, as the flights themselves increase the risk of getting a clot in the legs (lower extremities). However the sickle cell trait does not place you at any higher of a risk for a venous clot than the general population. Read more...
Probably Not. Traveling on a pressurized commercial airplane shouldn't pose anyproblems if you truly are carrying the trait (hb a/s) and not a variant (hb s/c) which has been associated with sickling in prolonged air trips although not (hb s/s). You need to have a hemoglobin electrophoresis as one way to diagnose these variants. Prevention is with supplemental o2 in flight. Read more...

What is the difference between sickle cell trait & sickle cell disease?

Carrier vs. Affected. Sickle cell trait denotes being a carrier while sickle cell disease is someone who has the disorder. Sickling requires 2 genes. A person with the s gene and a normal gene would be a carrier and considered to have sickle cell trait. Someone who has s and s would be considered to have sickle cell disease and would likley be affected. Read more...

If me and my partner has sickle cell trait, does this mean my child will surely get the disease?

Not necessarily. If you and your partner both have sickle cell trait, there is a 25% chance your child will be normal (not have sickle cell trait or anemia), a 50% chance they will have sickle cell trait (just like you and your partner), and a 25% chance they will have sickle cell disease. Prenatal diagnosis is available early in pregnancy that will tell you what your child has. Read more...

If you have only the sickle cell trait, can you sometimes suffer like a person who has the disease?

Sickle cell trait. Sickle cell trait shouldn't cause pain crises like someone with the disease. Sometimes patients are told they have trait but actually have sickle + thalassemia. Trait can cause problems however such as inability to concentrate the urine (isosthenuria), blood in the urine (renal papillary necrosis), kidney cancer, and sudden death if the patient gets dehydrated during vigorous physical exertion. Read more...
On rare occasions. People with sickle cell trait under normal conditions (climate, altitude, normal life style) do not have any symptoms of sicle cell disease. Very occasionally individulas who had severe stressful conditions (boot camp under extreme heat and with dehydration), or worked under significanly reduced oxygen pressure (high altitude) did experieince vaso-occulsive crisis. Or had sudden death. Read more...

Do both parents have to have the actual sickle cell trait in order for the child to have sickle disease sc or not?

No. Kids get 1 gene from each parent & have two genes when born. To come up with sc (a combination of 2 different genes) at least one parent must have 1 s gene and the other parent must have 1 c. Parents could both be sc and by giving one gene at a time, could yield ss(true sickle cell, sc(sickle c trait) or cc but I am not sure if that one survives. Usually one has a c & 1 an s. Read more...
No. One of the parents needs to have sickle cell trait and the other parent have hemoglobin c trait ( hemoglobin c mutation on at least one hemoglobin gene). Read more...
Sort of. Sickle cell disease can include at least 3 different conditions. 2 parents with sickle trait can have a child with sickle cell anemia. 1 parent with sickle trait and 1 with hemoglobin c trait, another abn hgb, have a 1/4 chance of a child with sc disease, while 1 with sickle trait and 1 with thalassemia trait have a 1/4 chance of a child with sickle/thalassemia. All are called sickle cell disease. Read more...