6 doctors weighed in:

Is there a way to have your DNA altered so you have 0% chance of having a child with downs?

6 doctors weighed in
Dr. James Ferguson
Pediatrics
2 doctors agree

In brief: Not a chance

At any age all pregnancies have about 4% risk of an unexpected outcome.
(Premi, cleft palate, infection,DS,etc) As you pass 40 you begin to add higher risk of DS,as lifelong exposures to toxins affects egg quality.You can get non-invasive (mother's blood) information on a pregnancy as early as 8-10 wks with NIPP.This test commonly done for paternity can also detect DS very early.

In brief: Not a chance

At any age all pregnancies have about 4% risk of an unexpected outcome.
(Premi, cleft palate, infection,DS,etc) As you pass 40 you begin to add higher risk of DS,as lifelong exposures to toxins affects egg quality.You can get non-invasive (mother's blood) information on a pregnancy as early as 8-10 wks with NIPP.This test commonly done for paternity can also detect DS very early.
Dr. James Ferguson
Dr. James Ferguson
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Dr. Steven Neish
Pediatrics - Cardiology
2 doctors agree

In brief: No

Although down syndrome is a genetic disease, it is not truly a disease of the dna.
Down syndrome is caused by an extra copy of chromosome 21 in the baby. Usually, there is a complete extra chromosome 21. Most typically, this occurs in egg as it develops in the ovary, although it can happen in the sperm. The most common cause of the extra chromosome is a phenomenon called nondisjunction.

In brief: No

Although down syndrome is a genetic disease, it is not truly a disease of the dna.
Down syndrome is caused by an extra copy of chromosome 21 in the baby. Usually, there is a complete extra chromosome 21. Most typically, this occurs in egg as it develops in the ovary, although it can happen in the sperm. The most common cause of the extra chromosome is a phenomenon called nondisjunction.
Dr. Steven Neish
Dr. Steven Neish
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Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics
1 doctor agrees

In brief: No

There is no way to change a parent's dna to prevent his/her children from having down syndrome.
Down syndrome's problem begins with making eggs (or sperm) where a "pre-egg" (or pre-sperm) cell with 46 chromosomes splits into 2 eggs (or 2 sperm). Each egg (or sperm) should get 23 chromosomes, but instead one egg ends up with both of the #21 chromosomes, leading to a baby with three #21's (trisomy).

In brief: No

There is no way to change a parent's dna to prevent his/her children from having down syndrome.
Down syndrome's problem begins with making eggs (or sperm) where a "pre-egg" (or pre-sperm) cell with 46 chromosomes splits into 2 eggs (or 2 sperm). Each egg (or sperm) should get 23 chromosomes, but instead one egg ends up with both of the #21 chromosomes, leading to a baby with three #21's (trisomy).
Dr. Robert Kwok
Dr. Robert Kwok
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