11 doctors weighed in:

What effect would posterior tendon release in big toe have on gait? Ii have claw toe due to nerve damage from laminectomy

11 doctors weighed in
Dr. Michele Arnold
Physical & Rehabilitation Medicine
3 doctors agree

In brief: Improvement

The posterior tibial tendon causes the foot and ankle to turn in (inversion).
Release of the posterior tibial tendon allows the arch of the foot to flatten, decreases ankle/foot inversion (turning in), and allows turning out (eversion). It would improve the rocker motion of the foot during gait. It may not effect a claw toe deformity unless the toe (flexor hallucis) tendons are also released.

In brief: Improvement

The posterior tibial tendon causes the foot and ankle to turn in (inversion).
Release of the posterior tibial tendon allows the arch of the foot to flatten, decreases ankle/foot inversion (turning in), and allows turning out (eversion). It would improve the rocker motion of the foot during gait. It may not effect a claw toe deformity unless the toe (flexor hallucis) tendons are also released.
Dr. Michele Arnold
Dr. Michele Arnold
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Dr. Jeffrey Kass
Podiatry
3 doctors agree

In brief: I am confused

The posterior tibial tendon does not attach anywhere to the big toe.

In brief: I am confused

The posterior tibial tendon does not attach anywhere to the big toe.
Dr. Jeffrey Kass
Dr. Jeffrey Kass
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Dr. Vern Chuba
Podiatry
2 doctors agree

In brief: Depends

I believe you mean the flexor digitorum longus release.
This tendon is typically released for a flexible claw toe deformity of the big toe. This will not cause a problem with gait.

In brief: Depends

I believe you mean the flexor digitorum longus release.
This tendon is typically released for a flexible claw toe deformity of the big toe. This will not cause a problem with gait.
Dr. Vern Chuba
Dr. Vern Chuba
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Dr. Payam Rafat
Podiatry
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Not an insertion.

If the posterior tibial tendon is release this would likely lead to a severe flatfoot deformity.
The posterior tibial tendon does not insert directly into the big toe.

In brief: Not an insertion.

If the posterior tibial tendon is release this would likely lead to a severe flatfoot deformity.
The posterior tibial tendon does not insert directly into the big toe.
Dr. Payam Rafat
Dr. Payam Rafat
Thank
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