If I have polyps in my colon, should I have genetic testing to see if I will likely have colon cancer?

Maybe, maybe not. Depends on family history of colon polyps, ca, other cancers, e.g. Ovarian, types of kidney ca, , age of affected relatives, your age, number of polyps, types of polyp. Most cases of colon polyps and colon cancer are sporadic (not hereditary). Discuss with your gastroenterologist and primary doc.
Yes. Ask your GI specialist about your risks to have a genetic mutation causing gardner syndrome (dark pigmentation, eye, tooth changes) or lynch syndrome (colon polyps without other physical changes). Gene testing is available for both and if positive, indicates very high risk for recurring colon cancer that often prompts colectomy.

Related Questions

I'm a 34 yr old female. My 63 y/o mother has colon cancer. Should I seek genetic testing? What are the pros/cons re: the genetic testing for me?

Screening yes. But not genetic testing, just having one family member is not an indication for genetic testing, how ever with that history you should have screening colonoscopy on regular basis. Good luck. Read more...

Does genetic testing help to find out if my colon cancer is passed from my parents?

Could help. A person does not inherit cancer per se from their parents but they could inherit genes that make it much more likely to develop it. Genetic tests currently available can identify some of those genes and help the patient and their families make right decisions. You are very young and if you have colon cancer, you should be seen by a professional with expertise in this matter. Best to you. Read more...
It may. There is a type of colon cancer for which the genes have been identified. This type of cancer is very aggressive so testing for the gene may be important. You should consult with your colon cancer specialist to determine if you need this test. Read more...

Grandfather had colon cancer at 87, uncle had noncancerous polyps at 48. Mother has no polyps. Likely a colon cancer gene?

Likely Not. You have to have three or more family members with a confirmed diagnosis of colorectal cancer, one of whom should be a first degree (parent, child, sibling) relative. Read more...
Probably no. Not a terribly impressive cancer history but in my experience, both patients and docs could do a much better job when getting a thorough family history. If you are concerned, get all the family info you can (members with any and all cancers and even those without) and visit with your doc. I've told patients to do that and occasionally get a surprise. Read more...
Probably not. All cancer is a genetic disease in some way but if you mean did you inherit a gene that causes cancer, then this history, as bad as it may seem, is fairly common. To suspect a genetic predisposition to cancer of the colon, you would need more than one grandfather effected, actually several family members. But colon cancer is common and everyone, including you, needs screening in their 50's. Read more...

My dad, his sis, brother and dad died of cancers (brain, stomach, liver) my grandma had colon Cancer. They found polyps in my colon, bad sign at 18?

What type of polyp. That many cancers may prove to be associated with a familial disorder requiring genetic evaluation. Polyps of colon extremely rare unless there is an underlying hereditary disorder. Important to know whether the polyps were inflammatory or adenomatous lesions that could lead to malignant transformation. Should genetic disorder be found, colon surgery may eventually be needed. Read more...
Polyps at age 18. means , you need to be under observation , polyps should be removed through colonoscopy If other members has colonic polyps , is indication for genetic testing . Don't worry just follow your doctors advise. Read more...