How accurate is the genetic testing for ovarian cancer?

Very if BRCA mutated. The genes brca1 and brca2 cause breast-ovarian cancer, suspected when women have onset of breast cancer before menopause or when there are several cases of breast/ovarian cancer in a family. Women with a brca mutation have as much as a 50% lifetime risk for ovarian cancer (85% for breast) and often choose prophylactic oophorectomy after positive brca testing since there is no good clinical screen.
Depends. If you test positive for a known mutation, you have an increased lifetime risk of ovarian cancer, 40% for brca and 12% for lynch syndrome. If you test negative for a mutation for which a family member with ovarian cancer was positive, then your risk is not increased. If you test negative but have a strong family history, you are still at increased risk due to other genes not tested.

Related Questions

Mom got ovarian cancer at 37. None of her other family got it or any other cancer. Should I consider genetic testing? How do I lower my risk?

No. While genetic testing has value in certain malignancies pointing out who is succeptible and requires careful evaluation such as in breast cancer and congenital polyposis as well as the Lynch Syndrome, ovarian adenoma ca has no major impact from congenital abnormalities. A periodic pelvic sonogram or digital pelvic exam yearly or bi yearly may be helpful. Read more...

My aunt (dad's sis) and grt-grandma (pat grandma's mom) both died of ovarian cancer. How likely is it hereditary? Would genetic testing be good idea?

May be. But need more than one in each generation , unfortunately no blood test for early detection of ovarian cancer, other than regular gyn exams with sonograms., beside breast cancer brca genetic mutation tests especially brca i is useful for ovarian cancer. Speak to your gyn doctor . Read more...
Possibly. Two family members with ovarian cancer is not that common. There are a few inherited conditions that increase ovarian cancer risk. I would suggest that you gather all family info you can get hold of (all family with or without cancer) and visit with your gyn or family doc. They will decide of you need to be seen by a specialist in hereditary cancer. Read more...

Is ovarian cancer more or less likely to be "genetic/hereditary"?

Often it is not gene. Only 10-20% cases are genetic or hereditary in origin, rest are sporadic or not related to previous family history...Just come out of the blue in more than 80% of cases. Read more...

Is ovarian cancer genetic?

Sometimes. Certain genotypes such as the brca mutations have a higher incidence of ovarian cancer. Read more...
Yes. About 1 in 7 woman with ovarian cancer have a genetic mutation in the brca1 or brca2 gene that is passed down from mother or father. However, 6 of 7 have no known mutation and may not be genetic or we haven't found the other links yet. This gene is also linked to breast cancer. Read more...

If a family member has ovarian cancer, can genetic screening determine if other family members will get the disease?

Yes. Ovarian cancer, especially pre-menopausal ovarian cancer is a rare disease and i recommend family members of such patients atleast have a genetics consultation to talk about testing. Brca-1 and brca-2 mutations put women at a much higher risk of developing ovarian, breast and endometrial cancers. More common in jewish women. Hnpcc (lynch syndrome) also increases the risks of female cancers. Read more...
The BRCA. Family type i & ii are associated with not only ovary bit breast cancer, and screening alllows your family to make decisions about their breasts and ovaries before cancer develops. Read more...

Isnt it better to be testing for ovarian cancer earlier?

Makes sense but.... It is a great idea but unfortunately there is no screening test available that can identify ovarian cancer early on in women. Read more...
A great idea but.... That is the idea of studies done in the past- to see if we screen everybody who is asymptomatic and follow them up with either cancer marker or sonogram surveilalnce- whether we can actually detect more ovarian cancer at earlier stage. The answer of the studies, unfortunately, despites all the ultrasounds and cancer markers- unfortunately , majority of cancer found were already stage iii. Read more...

How accurate is the ca-125 test for an ovarian cancer?

Not very. Ca 125 is touted as a screening tool for ov ca but is elevated in only 50% of those with early stage disease. Approx 1% of normals have a high ca 125. Since ovarian cancer is relatively uncommon, the ability of a positive test to predict ca is about 3%. There is general consensus that ca 125 is not a good screening tool for average risk females. Consider ca 125 for those with high risk. Read more...