4 doctors weighed in:

Does inbreeding in families cause hemophilia to develop?

4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Golder Wilson
Clinical Genetics
2 doctors agree

In brief: Not usually

Despite emphasis on hemophilia and royal families, rasputin's influence depended on common relatives among english/russian royalty.
The well-known hemophilias are x-linked, passed through normal women with 2 xs to men with one. Inbreeding increases chances for matching up of rare, autosomal recessive mutations in spouses (e.g., cystic fibrosis, tay-sach's diseases).

In brief: Not usually

Despite emphasis on hemophilia and royal families, rasputin's influence depended on common relatives among english/russian royalty.
The well-known hemophilias are x-linked, passed through normal women with 2 xs to men with one. Inbreeding increases chances for matching up of rare, autosomal recessive mutations in spouses (e.g., cystic fibrosis, tay-sach's diseases).
Dr. Golder Wilson
Dr. Golder Wilson
Thank
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Pathology

In brief: No

Both common forms of hemophilia are single-gene, X-linked recessives; transmitted by Mom -- Dad's sons will be unaffected, daughters carriers.
Inbreeding brings out autosomal recessives instead, shared by cousins. This is very basic biology. This being said, marrying a close relative is a VERY bad idea for this reason.

In brief: No

Both common forms of hemophilia are single-gene, X-linked recessives; transmitted by Mom -- Dad's sons will be unaffected, daughters carriers.
Inbreeding brings out autosomal recessives instead, shared by cousins. This is very basic biology. This being said, marrying a close relative is a VERY bad idea for this reason.
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Thank
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