Can men get breast cancer, should I get tested if many of the women in my family have gotten it?

Yes. Breast cancer in men is rare, but it happens. Men over 60 are more likely to get breast cancer. If you have a family history of breast and ovarian cancer or male breast cancer, you could have a brca mutation and should talk to your doctor about genetic testing. Men and women with a brca mutation have a higher chance of getting breast cancer and other cancers.
They can. Men can get breast cancer. Perhaps it would be best for your family to meet with a genetic counselor to determine your risk and possible recommend genetic testing.
Male breast cancer. Yes, if many of women in your family have breast ca- there is risk that hereditary cancer may be in your family. You should talk to your family members- ( better be direct family member) who are affected by breast cancer and have them checked for certain genetic mutation. If any of them positive- you should see a genetician and see what is your risk and from there-have certain genetic test done.

Related Questions

If two members of my immediate family developed breast cancer, should I get tested for the brca gene?

Possibly. It's always better to test the family members who have breast cancer if possible. If they are first degree relatives (mother, daughter or sister) and one was under age 50 at diagnosis, you might meet criteria for brca testing. It's best to meet with a genetic counselor who can help guide you and your family so the correct people are tested. There are non-brca mutations as well. Read more...
Maybe. It would be best if the family member with the breast cancer gets brca testing. If it was positive then you definitely need to be tested too. If she was negative, then the cancer was probably not related to brca gene mutations and you won't need to be tested. You still will be at higher for breast ca. If your family member was not willing or able to test, then you may want to be tested. Read more...
Depends. It would depend on your heritage and also at what age were your immediate family members diagnosed. I would seek the advice of a genetic counselor. Read more...
Absolutely. Women w/ 2+ immediate family members w/ a hx of breast/ovarian CA at 50% chance of developing breast cancer. If you have it, get screened with CA-125 blood test, ultrasound, mammogram/MRI, usually starting at age 30. Surgery after childbearing. Read more...

Cancer: Do men get breast cancer at the same rate of incidence as women during most of their lifetime?

No. no the breast cancer in men is significantly less prevalence than women. breast cancer does occur in men. In 2012 it was estimated that 2,190 new cases in males would develop, with 410 deaths. It tends to occur at a later age in men than in women, with the male peak age being 71 years old as opposed to peaks at 51 and 71 years old in women. Some men ignore breast lumps or think they are caused by an infection or some other reason and they do not get medical treatment until the mass has grown significantly. Read more...

What causes women to get breast cancer more often than men? Is it because of cosmetics?

Not cosmetic. Women have many more active cells in their breast tissue resposible for milk production. All of these cells respond and change to the monthly hormonal changes that a woman experiences all the way from their first menstrual cycle as a teenager to menopause. Breast cancer most commonly forms in these active cells of the milk ducts or lobules. These breast tissue cells are much less prominent in men. Read more...

Paternal grandfather had breast cancer in his 70s. no other immediate family history. I'm a 30 y/o woman, am I at greater risk? When to get 1st mammo?

Not greater risk. Unless familial history with BRACA gene, 95% of breast cancers are environmentally related, usually with virus exposure to the MMTV virus. At age 30 physical breast exam monthly most important. Mammo not good choice since breast tissue at your age sensitive to RT and too dense to reveal most lesions. One mammo at 35 and if normal next ones begin yearly starting at age 40. Read more...

When do you get regular mammograms? Breast cancer does not run in my family, but I want to make sure I'm doing everything to stay in good health. At what age do you recommend women start getting mammograms?

Currently, . Currently, at our institution we recommend that a woman with no risk factors begin yearly screening mammography at age 40. However, the recommendation for beginning screening mammography has become more controversial due to the recently published recommendations by the us preventative services task force which recommends screening mammography for women age 50 to 74 years. A rationale behind this recommendation is that screening mammography in women age 40 - 49 years results in more false positive results with comparatively few cancers detected. Currently, both the american college of radiology and the american cancer society recommend yearly screening beginning at 40 years of age. Read more...

Family history breast cancer, even Mom. 2 cousins got breast cancer but tested negative BRAC1/2. Should I get test. Cancer on both sides family?

Discuss with. loved ones and your doctor. Also discuss what the options are for the possible results. Read more...
Genetic counselor. You and your mom should meet with a genetic counselor. They will sit with you and discuss the family history and draw out a family tree to determine where the risk may be. Check with your local breast cancer center for a referral. Read more...