What treatment would I get for opioid induced low testosterone / hypogonadism? 34 - male - canada

Opioid testosterone. Opioid induced supression of testosterone is common. You will need to be placed on a testosterone supplement (like androgel, testoplex, fortesta). Your levels will have to be checked again in about 3-4 months.

Related Questions

17YR old MALE Hypogonadism, micropenis. No signs of low testosterone as of mid '14. Please help with test etc. To ask to b performed. I'm on Rx opioids?

Here are some... Your concerned issues in genital organ/function can not be answered in a 400-letter space, and you should seek a collaborated comprehensive evaluation, treatment, monitoring, & counseling so to reach an optimal help to suit your need. Online sporadic information may adversely add more confusion, fear, and anxiety, instead of help. Read more...

Could males with hypogonadism/low testosterone lose their body and facial hair?

FACIAL HAIR. The other hormone levels can deterimine the risk of that. Several things come into play including the cause of the hypogonadism and the age at the start. Read more...
Not usually . But low testosterone causes other problems. It makes men more prone to gynecomastia. Libido decreases, moods can become depressed, muscle tone decreases, bone mass decreases, etc. With appropriate treatment these problems can improve or be avoided. Read more...

I have severe hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with very low testosterone levels caused by pituitary adenoma (prolactin). Is fertility still a possibility or not?

Yes. Once your prolactin is closer to normal with medication, the hormones related to testosterone and sperm production should improve, allowing you to become fertile. This may take a few months. Occasionally, surgical removal of a macroadenoma that does not respond to medical treatment may be needed. Treatment with HCG and hmg should also work if needed. Read more...
Yes. Hyperprolactinemia is a common cause of infertility in males and often a reversible and treatable cause with either medication or surgery. As you have mentioned, often related to a pituitary adenoma and associated with low testosterone. The presence and degree of infertilty is best assessed by obtaining a semen analysis. Read more...
Yes. Medication, surgery, or even radiation. Medication sometimes fails and surgery can lead to other issues and even affect vision. Some of these tumors are not resectable fully with out causing issue(s). Once the lesion is controlled, the key is having the situation reviewed by your endocrinologist to see what needs to be done to allow normal fertility. Read more...