7 doctors weighed in:
Do the children of two parents who both have celiac disease always have the disease?
7 doctors weighed in

Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics
4 doctors agree
In brief: Usually yes
Celiac disease is inherited mainly in an autosomal recessive way, meaning that two parents with celiac disease are both likely to have 2 celiac disease genes each.
Their child gets one celiac disease gene from each parent, so he also is born with 2 celiac disease genes. That means the child is at high risk for getting the disease, but if he is very very lucky, it might not happen.

In brief: Usually yes
Celiac disease is inherited mainly in an autosomal recessive way, meaning that two parents with celiac disease are both likely to have 2 celiac disease genes each.
Their child gets one celiac disease gene from each parent, so he also is born with 2 celiac disease genes. That means the child is at high risk for getting the disease, but if he is very very lucky, it might not happen.
Dr. Robert Kwok
Dr. Robert Kwok
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Dr. Barbara Stark Baxter
Internal Medicine - Allergy & Immunology
In brief: Celiac genetics
Multiple genes are known to confer an increased risk of celiac disease, so there is not a simple answer to the question you ask, but the answer is probably not.
Usually, along with the genes that increase your risk, you also have other genes that do not increase your risk, so unless both parents have multiple abnormal genes, at least some of the couple's children should be unaffected.

In brief: Celiac genetics
Multiple genes are known to confer an increased risk of celiac disease, so there is not a simple answer to the question you ask, but the answer is probably not.
Usually, along with the genes that increase your risk, you also have other genes that do not increase your risk, so unless both parents have multiple abnormal genes, at least some of the couple's children should be unaffected.
Dr. Barbara Stark Baxter
Dr. Barbara Stark Baxter
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Dr. Jack Mutnick
Internal Medicine - Allergy & Immunology
In brief: Not necessarily
It increases the risk but it does not guarantee the disease to be transmitted to the child.
Testing is unnecessary unless he/she manifests symptoms. One would assume your house is already gluten-free so no reason to waste money on another blood test.

In brief: Not necessarily
It increases the risk but it does not guarantee the disease to be transmitted to the child.
Testing is unnecessary unless he/she manifests symptoms. One would assume your house is already gluten-free so no reason to waste money on another blood test.
Dr. Jack Mutnick
Dr. Jack Mutnick
Thank
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