What is the suturing technique called for shoulder arthroscopy?

Many Options. You may find it interesting that many devices are available that allow surgeons to perform shoulder repairs without tying knots or suturing. Most good studies that compare the two find that tying knots and suturing results in much better healing so i would recommend you ask your surgeon about this instead...Do you use knotless anchors or do you place sutures and tie knots? How many have you done?
Many. The suturing technique first depends on the type of repair being performed (rotator cuff repair, labral repair, slap repair), then depends more on recreating the original anatomy. There are so many suturing techniques that most of them do well as long as they restore anatomy. Most of them have fancy names, but the goals are all the same.
Technique varies. I believe and utilize a double row repair of the rotator cuff. This provides excellent fixation and multiple redundant stitches. The way i see it, i one stitch or anchor fails, I have several others that can make up for it. Thank you.

Related Questions

What is the suturing technique used for shoulder arthroscopy?

Knots vs knot-less. To fix a rotator cuff tear arthroscopically, you have to do 3 things. 1: identify the torn cuff. 2: mobilize the torn cuff toinge bone. 3: secure the torn tendon to the bone. Arthroscopic suture techniques are used to complete part 3. Suture, with or with-out an anchor, is placed into the rotator cuff. Sometimes the sutures are tied to a bone anchor (knot) or impacted into bone (knot-less). Read more...
Highly Variable. It depends significantly on the type of surgery performed (rotator cuff, labrum, etc.) and also the skill and experience of the surgeon. Many surgeons use knotless devices where no knot tying is required, however, i recommend you seek out a shoulder specialist that ties knots for everything as the results are much better. Learn more here: http://www.Theshouldercenter.Com/shoulderpain/2010/shoulde. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: shoulder arthroscopy?

Scope. Evaluation and treatment of the shoulder joint and structures by means of a joint scope (arthroscope). Read more...
Shoulder arthroscopy. Involves making small portals (holes) around the shoulder where a camera (arthroscope) can be introduced for both diagnostic and operative care. Additional portals are used to remove loose bodies if present, repair a torn labrum or cuff tendon, shave down bone if indicated. Read more...
Minimally invasive. Shoulder arthroscopy is a procedure whereby fiber optics are used to perform minimally invasive surgery. The word arthroscopy means the use of a camera to visualize inside a joint. Many different procedures can be done via arthroscopy, including rotator cuff repairs, labrum repairs, and debridement. Read more...

How common is infection with shoulder arthroscopy?

Rare but known risk. Infection after shoulder arthroscopy is a rare problem, but is seen enough to have established treatment protocols. Propionibacterium acne is the typical culprit in these infections. Iv antibiotics are given initially and surgical lavage may be needed. Once culture results have been obtained, antibiotics can be customized to more effectively treat the infection. Read more...
Less than 1% Typically the rate of infection for most arthroscopies and for shoulder arthroscopy in particular in less than 1%. Some patients may have pre-existing conditions that raise the risk . Read more...

Undergoing a key hole surgery (shoulder arthroscopy) so what anestheisa?

Depends. Typically i recommend combination of general anesthesia with a regional block (inter scalene of supraclaviclar). Blocks do have risks, and these should be discussed with your anesthesiologist. However, there is very good evidence showing use of pre-op block lessens post-op pain. Read more...
Depends. Each surgeon and facility have their own preferred method of anesthesia. We utilize a brachial plexus block placed with ultrasound which is then supplemented with a light general anesthetic. This really helps patients with pain control for the first 2-3 days following surgery. Read more...
Combined. Usually a block to numb the arm and general anesthesia to protect your breathing. Read more...
See below. This is usually done under general anesthesia, with the possibility of a regional block to assist with post-operative pain. Read more...