How is PFO (patent foramen ovale) treated?

PFO. Patent foramen ovale or pfo is a congenital remnant which normally closes at birth but for several reasons can open later in life. Blood or clots can travel across and if they do, the opening should be closed. It can be closed either surgically or by a catheter based procedure.
Usually ignored. This is considered an innocent variation in the formation of the heart that is compatible with a normal lifespan without heart problems & requires no intervention.
Depends . A lot depends on the size of the pfo and whether there are symptoms. Most pfo's are asymptomatic and do not affect one's quality of life.

Related Questions

How do I know if I have a pfo (patent foramen ovale)?

Echo. Only way to know is by echocardiogram. Sometimes, especially in adults, an injection of agitated saline during the echo may be necessary. Also, if image quality is limited, which is usually the case in adults, a transesophageal echo (echo done through introducing the probe into the esophagus) is necessary to look for a patent foramen ovale (pfo). Read more...

Can you tell me if a child has a PFO (patent foramen ovale), what to do?

Often nothing. I would see a cardiologist for complete info. It needs to be followed to be sure it closes...And most do. Read more...
Nothing. A pfo is a small opening in the wall between the upper chambers (atria) of the heart. It is present in everyone at birth and closes in about 80% of people by one year of life. So it is present in about 20% of "normal" people. In general, no intervention is required and it causes no symptoms. Read more...

A newborn with a PFO (patent foramen ovale) has what other conditions?

PFO. An opening between two chambers of the heart that will normally close on it's own in a few days or weeks, your pediatrician can follow this in conjunction with a peds cardiologist. Not to worry about other problems neccissarily. Read more...
PFO. A patent foramen ovale is a common echocardiograph finding in a newborn in the first days of life. It is usually not associated with other cardiac defects. The foramen ovale is a fetal shunt present in the heart when the baby is a fetus and then closes after birth as does the patent ductus arteriosus. Read more...

Is it possible for a child to have a patent foramen ovale (pfo) and a patent ductis arteriosus (pda)?

Yes. It is a normal feature of the heart prior to birth and may persist in some. The PDA is usually picked up on exam, the pfo would only be accessible to advanced studies. Read more...

Can you give me more info on experience with a child who has a patent foramen ovale (pfo) and a patent ductis arteriosus (pda)?

Common. All normal fetuses have a pfo and a pda. These are connections between the "left heart" and the "right heart" that allow blood to bypass the lungs and flow properly to the placenta. Typically, in the first 24 hours after birth, the PDA closes. Pfo closure can be more gradual and can be present for many months, and still be a normal finding. Persistent patency can be a problem. Read more...

Whats a patent foramen ovale?

Small heart opening. It is an opening in the wall between the upper chambers of the heart that allows blood from the placenta to get to where it needs to go during fetal life. All babies are born with this. It usually closes after birth, but 20% of all adults still have this. It is normal, though it has been associated with stroke, migraine headach, and decompression illness in scuba divers. Read more...
Hole in the heart. Patent foramen ovale is a opening between the atria (upper chambers ) of the heart. It allows blood to traverse the atria when a fetus. After birth the pfo closes to establish normal post natal circulation. Read more...

What is a patent foramen ovale?

A hole in the heart. A patent foramen ovale (pfo) is a necessary hole between two upper chambers of the heart. This hole allows fetal blood circulation to occurr. Once the baby is born, circulation changes, the hole closes to allow normal post natal human circulatuin pathway. It remains open in a small number of patients and is usually asymptomatic. Read more...

How to correct patent foramen ovale?

Depends . . . Check out http://www.Mayoclinic.Com/health/patent-foramen-ovale/ds00728/dsection=treatments-and-drugs for some basic ideas. Then chat w/your cardiologist to find out what's done in australia. Read more...
Usually nothing. A pfo is a remnant of the fetal circulation--everyone is born with this small flap in the wall between the 2 upper heart chambers. For most people this flap eventually fuses shut, but for some it never closes. 10-20% of people are walking around with a pfo and need no treatment or intervention. In the rare cases where it needs to be closed, a catheterization procedure can close it w/o surgery. Read more...