Is nocturnal epilepsy hereditary?

Nocturnal epilepsy. Some are. Others are not. Most neurologists would be able to tell you if they feel that yours is genetic based.
Yes. We are becoming more aware of the hereditary risk for families with a history of epilepsy. Specific epilepsy types often tend to run in families. There are genetic markers that can be studied to see if a common marker exists in the family and if it correlates with the risk for epilepsy. However, there is no prevention or avoidance of the risk. Good seizure management is necessary, regardless.

Related Questions

Will I ever grow out of nocturnal epilepsy?

Sleeprelat. epilepsy. Nocturnal epilepsy can be outgrown in some patients but most requires lifelong treatment. If, however, it is not a childhood form of epilepsy or one that was causes by a specific brain lesion, some are outgrown. There are some patients that have only due to sleep apnea causing low oxygen. Treating apnea makes the epilepsy to remit. Hope this helps. Read more...
It is possible. Epilepsy is a condition that can be out grown. A reasonable percentage of patients will eventually be "cured" of their epilepsy. There is no guarantee. Good control is the first approach. If no seizures for more than 2 years, trial off medication is justified. If no seizures on no medication for reasonable time, then consider it out grown. Read more...
Outgrowing epilepsy. We now are aware of many genetic epilepsy syndromes which usually are associated with lifelong tendency to have epilepsy, a few have only night time seizures. Genetic or not, many people will have a very long or complete remission in their epilepsy. Key: insist on a treatment on which you feel good and have no seizures that is adequately affordable w/few risks then live well! Read more...

If I have nocturnal epilepsy can I still get a drivers license?

Depends on state law. Depending on the state law where you live, seizures of any kind have to be in control with no recent seizure for you to maintain your drivers license. Read more...
If controlled. Most states have laws concerning criteria for getting a license with a diagnosis of epilepsy. Most insist on 6 to 12 months seizure free before being able to get the license. This includes nocturnal seizures as well as day time seizures. Discuss with your doctor. Good control is the goal regardless of the time of day of seizures. Nocturnal seizures are not less significant. Read more...
Depends.. . Depends upon the state you live in. Check the american epilepsy society website. Read more...

What is the difference between regular epilepsy and nocturnal epilepsy?

Seizures in sleep. Nocturnal epilepsy is epilepsy (seizures) ocuring during sleep. Sleep increases or brings out many kinds of seizures, so patients with epilepsy may have seizures during sleep. In nocturnal epilepsy, seizures are limited to sleep, such as in benign rolandic epilepsy of childhood, or in certain abnormal movements or behaviors in sleep which can be caused by frontal lobe seizures. Read more...
None really. Epilepsy is a condition of recurrent seizures. Seizures may be triggered by different conditions. Sleep is a very activating condition for some patients. However, the risk for seizures would be high even without sleep. It is important to discuss these issues with your doctor. Epilepsy needs good control, regardless of when they tend to occur. Read more...

What is the fdifference between regular epilepsy and nocturnal epilepsy?

Occurs during sleep. Nocturnal epilepsy is epilepsy or seizures occuring at night (during sleep). Sleep tends to bring out seizures that occur any time of day or night, but there are also some seizures that occur only during sleep, such as benign rolandic epilepsy in children or frontal lobe seizures with abnormal movements in sleep in adults. Treatment involves use of medicines to control seizures. Read more...
Epilepsy. Seizures may occur during the day or at night. There are specific seizure syndromes that are time of day related. Both forms are usually treated with anti seizure medications.. An eeg as well as history may provide a neurologist with the information needed to treat the seizures. Read more...

I've been performing inevitable routines, isolation's always been part of me as my weird way of thinking. I have nocturnal epilepsy, all its fault?

No real fault. Epilepsy and behavior are closely linked. Having epilepsy can make you feel depressed or isolated, and feeling isolated can bring out epilepsy. Emotional reactions can be a result of epilepsy medication. Sleep deprivation from nocturnal seizures can cause behavioral problems and promote more seizures. These issues need to be addressed with your doctor in detail. Read more...
Inevitable routines? Recurrent routines and isolation may be a mood or anxiety problem, not infrequent with seizure problems. I am not aware of nocturnal epilepsy but i assume this means you have nightime seizures. Make sure your seizure meds can help mood (is lamictal) and some meds can help anxiety, sleep and seizures, clonazepam. Neurologist r not always great psychiatrist si if sufferring find a good psychiatri. Read more...

Are nocturnal epilepsy and asperger's related?

No. Epilepsy is a separate disorder. It does occur more often in the autistic spectrum disorders than in normal population. Seizures from sleep are just an interesting variation of epilepsy. There is a benign form commonly seen in children that disappears with age. Read more...
Aspergers. No. They are not related. But sleep issues are common with aspergers. Here is a video to help. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_anfbme4aym. Read more...

While my friends sleeps he foams at the mouth and freezes. Could this be nocturnal epilepsy?

Does not sound norma. That is certainly a possiblity and there are other "parasomnias" that can cause this behavior. This is easily clarified with a sleep study which a primary care doctor can arrange. During a sleep study brain waves and patterns are measured and epileptic behavior would likely be detected. It would also be noteworthy to keep a log before any appointment as to how he feels after sleeping like that. Read more...
Need neuro eval. Recording his sleep with eeg would be the answer. If one of these events can be caught on the eeg, it would answer whether they are seizures. They could be sleep related events of an non-epileptic nature. Have him get a thorough medical evaluation and recommend a referral for neurological evaluation. Read more...
Nocturnal Epilepsy. Yes. Have him see a neurologist. If they check an EEG they may not notice a problem esp if he is awaken during the testing. In my practice when I am concerned that my patient has seizures in sleep I strongly consider an overnight EEG - can be in hospital or at home. Unfortunately, at home overnight EEGs (AEEG) are not available everywhere. . Read more...

Does smoking pot cause nocturnal epilepsy?

Not typically. Virtually anyone's brain will seize if you do enough bad things to stress it, in research it is common to model epilepsy by placing certain irritating chemicals on the brain of mice. While the effect of marijuana on lowering one's seizure threshold (tendency of the brain to have seizures) isn't that clear, it is an illicit substance and may contain things like Cocaine or meth, that cause seizures. Read more...
Not likely. In fact, there are many claims that marijuana reduces seizures, and in some people actually makes them seizure-free without other anticonvulsant medications. This is not proven, but there are cannabinoid compounds which have been shown to have anti-seizure activity. All that being said, individual reactions may be very different, and there may be folks where it could set off seizures. Read more...

Will lamotragine help me with my nocturnal epilepsy?

Lamotragine. Depending on type of nocturnal seizures and the dose of medication, Lamictal can be helpful. Please discuss with qualified neurologist or sleep specialist with regards to your particular case. Read more...
It should. Lamotrigine or Lamictal is a very good medication for epilepsy. There is a risk for allergic rash, but otherwise is very safe and effective. There is a reasonable chance of good response to a single agent for epilepsy. Lamotrigine is excellent as a trial for good response. There are many good agents available. If Lamotrigine is not effective, there are plenty more to try. Read more...