18 doctors weighed in:
Is there a surgery for plantar fasciitis?
18 doctors weighed in

Dr. Ellen Wenzel
Podiatry
4 doctors agree
In brief: Yes
When all other measures have been exhausted, surgery for plantar fasciitis may be indicated.
Surgery involves release of the plantar fascia itself. This can be done by an open procedure with one of several incision approaches or endoscopically. The procedure chosen by a surgeon is based on preference and patient selection criteria.

In brief: Yes
When all other measures have been exhausted, surgery for plantar fasciitis may be indicated.
Surgery involves release of the plantar fascia itself. This can be done by an open procedure with one of several incision approaches or endoscopically. The procedure chosen by a surgeon is based on preference and patient selection criteria.
Dr. Ellen Wenzel
Dr. Ellen Wenzel
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1 comment
Dr. Adam Teichman
There are many surgeries for resolving plantar fascia. The most comon with a great track record if a plantar fasciotomy ( releasing the medial plantar fascia). Recently there are newer treatments on the market that can prevent surgical management and prevent any down time off your foot. Extracorporal Shock wave is a treatment used to treat chronic plantar fasciitis. There is a newer procedure on the market call the fast technique with great success and little time off your feet. Check out heelpainnow.com for more information.
Dr. Libby Putnam
Podiatry
2 doctors agree
In brief: Combo treatment.
The more you can do together, the better: #1: supportive shoes.
#2: firm inserts or orthotics. #3: oral antiinflammatories (check with your doctor for dosing). #4: stretching your foot and calf. #5: icing (10 min at a time). You may also need physical therapy or cortisone injections, or eswt if available in your area. Very few people go on to surgery, but it is a possible treatment.

In brief: Combo treatment.
The more you can do together, the better: #1: supportive shoes.
#2: firm inserts or orthotics. #3: oral antiinflammatories (check with your doctor for dosing). #4: stretching your foot and calf. #5: icing (10 min at a time). You may also need physical therapy or cortisone injections, or eswt if available in your area. Very few people go on to surgery, but it is a possible treatment.
Dr. Libby Putnam
Dr. Libby Putnam
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Dr. Peter Nefcy
Radiology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Yes, but.....
Do not have surgery unless the plantar fascia is rupture or you are dying.

In brief: Yes, but.....
Do not have surgery unless the plantar fascia is rupture or you are dying.
Dr. Peter Nefcy
Dr. Peter Nefcy
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Dr. David Moats
Podiatry
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Yes as a last resort
My practice has a special focus on plantar fasciitis.
Surgery can include a partial cutting of the plantar fascial ligament thru a small incision or with an endoscope. Conservative care must be exhausted first which includes custom orthotics,medications, cortisone injections, stretching, and a nightsplint. Other non surgical procedures include the MLS Laser and Extra Corpeal Shock Wave.

In brief: Yes as a last resort
My practice has a special focus on plantar fasciitis.
Surgery can include a partial cutting of the plantar fascial ligament thru a small incision or with an endoscope. Conservative care must be exhausted first which includes custom orthotics,medications, cortisone injections, stretching, and a nightsplint. Other non surgical procedures include the MLS Laser and Extra Corpeal Shock Wave.
Dr. David Moats
Dr. David Moats
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Dr. Robert Mihalich
Orthopedic Surgery - Foot & Ankle
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Yes
This is controversial and should not be done unless all non operative options have been exhausted.
Currently, the most common surgeries are partial plantar fascia release and/or gastrocnemius release. However, 90% of people will have no pain within 1 year without surgery.

In brief: Yes
This is controversial and should not be done unless all non operative options have been exhausted.
Currently, the most common surgeries are partial plantar fascia release and/or gastrocnemius release. However, 90% of people will have no pain within 1 year without surgery.
Dr. Robert Mihalich
Dr. Robert Mihalich
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Dr. Jason Rubin
Podiatry
In brief: Yes
As others have mentioned surgery can be done to treat plantar fasciitis.
Plantar fasciotomies and endoscopic plantar fasciotomies are relatively common procedures but are mainly done as a last resort when all conservative measures have failed. Each physician has their own algorithm on how to treat this. But while the surgery does have a recurrence rate it is generally an effective treatment.

In brief: Yes
As others have mentioned surgery can be done to treat plantar fasciitis.
Plantar fasciotomies and endoscopic plantar fasciotomies are relatively common procedures but are mainly done as a last resort when all conservative measures have failed. Each physician has their own algorithm on how to treat this. But while the surgery does have a recurrence rate it is generally an effective treatment.
Dr. Jason Rubin
Dr. Jason Rubin
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Dr. Clarence Lyons
Family Medicine
In brief: Yes
http://www.aidmyplantar.com/plantar-fasciitis/plantar-fasciitis-surgery-rehabilitation.
php

In brief: Yes
http://www.aidmyplantar.com/plantar-fasciitis/plantar-fasciitis-surgery-rehabilitation.
php
Dr. Clarence Lyons
Dr. Clarence Lyons
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Dr. Jeffrey Kass
Podiatry
In brief: Yes
Many kinds too. But, i would stress conservative treatment and only recommend surgery as a last resort.

In brief: Yes
Many kinds too. But, i would stress conservative treatment and only recommend surgery as a last resort.
Dr. Jeffrey Kass
Dr. Jeffrey Kass
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