Do people ever need multiple surgeries for plantar fasciitis?

Yes. Yes, if scar tissue develops around the medial calcaneal (heel) nerve then another surgery may be needed. Sometimes a small incision plantar fasciotomy fails and larger incision surgery may be needed to also remove a heelspur.
Rarely. . Plantar fasciitis is generally resolved with conservative treatments, possible injections and physical therapy. In rare cases the patient requires surgery, and it's very rare that they need more than one, but it does happen, especially in complicated cases that involve flatfeet, or nerve compression.
It is possible. Ideally, you would only want one. However, nothing is perfect and if one doesn't obtain relief after a first attempt the surgeon may want to try a different approach or type of procedure.
No. A plantar fasciotomy is a definitive treatment to alleviate heel pain. Recovery can take e a couple of weeks to months depending on how the procedure is performed. Usually an endoscopic plantar fasciotomy is the procedure of choice.

Related Questions

Is there a surgery for plantar fasciitis?

Yes. This is controversial and should not be done unless all non operative options have been exhausted. Currently, the most common surgeries are partial plantar fascia release and/or gastrocnemius release. However, 90% of people will have no pain within 1 year without surgery. Read more...
Yes. When all other measures have been exhausted, surgery for plantar fasciitis may be indicated. Surgery involves release of the plantar fascia itself. This can be done by an open procedure with one of several incision approaches or endoscopically. The procedure chosen by a surgeon is based on preference and patient selection criteria. Read more...
Yes. Many kinds too. But, i would stress conservative treatment and only recommend surgery as a last resort. Read more...
Combo treatment. . The more you can do together, the better: #1: supportive shoes. #2: firm inserts or orthotics. #3: oral antiinflammatories (check with your doctor for dosing). #4: stretching your foot and calf. #5: icing (10 min at a time). You may also need physical therapy or cortisone injections, or eswt if available in your area. Very few people go on to surgery, but it is a possible treatment. Read more...
Yes as a last resort. My practice has a special focus on plantar fasciitis. Surgery can include a partial cutting of the plantar fascial ligament thru a small incision or with an endoscope. Conservative care must be exhausted first which includes custom orthotics,medications, cortisone injections, stretching, and a nightsplint. Other non surgical procedures include the MLS Laser and Extra Corpeal Shock Wave. Read more...
Yes. http://www.aidmyplantar.com/plantar-fasciitis/plantar-fasciitis-surgery-rehabilitation.php. Read more...
Yes, but..... Do not have surgery unless the plantar fascia is rupture or you are dying. Read more...
Yes. As others have mentioned surgery can be done to treat plantar fasciitis. Plantar fasciotomies and endoscopic plantar fasciotomies are relatively common procedures but are mainly done as a last resort when all conservative measures have failed. Each physician has their own algorithm on how to treat this. But while the surgery does have a recurrence rate it is generally an effective treatment. Read more...

Has anyone here done surgery for plantar fasciitis?

Surgery works... ...But should be a last resort. The vast majority of plantar fasciitis cases are handled with conservative treatment. In columbus, consider a second opinion with dr charles greiner or dr animesh bhatia. Read more...
Yes, but.... Surgery for plantar fasciitis should only be used if all conservative methods have failed. Things that should be tried first include physical therapy/stretching protocol, medication, radial shockwave therapy, and in some cases injections of anti-inflammatories. I would seek the attention of an orthopedic foot and ankle surgeon. One in your area can be found at www.Aofas.Org. Read more...

Will plantar fasciitis heal on its own without surgery?

Yes. With orthotics molded 4 ur problem and watch 4 things that irritate it & avoid. Comfortable running shoes will soften impact while walking. I've had it both feet over time. Wore my running shoes ever day and it went away eventually. Nike used 2 have very comfy shoes, now try asics, new balance, brooks, etc. When u put them on& walk around the store they should feel great right away. Read more...
Most of the time. You can try icing, stretching and orthotics as a first line of treatment. If this fails, see a podiatrist as they specialize in this condition and will have more treatment options readily available to you i.E possibly ultrasound, shockwave, laser treatments, they will also be able to perform a biomechanical exam. Many have sonograms in their office to visibly examine the fascial tissue. Read more...
Very often... I'd say 98% of my plantar fascitis patients respond to non-surgical treatments... Rest, supportive insoles, rx orthotics, otc anti-inflammatories (like aleve), prescription nsaid's, steroid injections, prp injections, physical therapy, etc... Read more...
Usually. The more you can do together, the better: #1: supportive shoes. #2: firm inserts or orthotics. #3: oral antiinflammatories (check with your doctor for dosing). #4: stretching your foot and calf. #5: icing (10 min at a time). You may also need physical therapy or cortisone injections, or eswt if available in your area. Very few people go on to surgery, but it is a possible treatment. Read more...

Can I take any anti-inflammatories for plantar fasciitis instead of going to surgery?

Absolutely. If that option has not been offered or you have not tried it, you should not be considering surgery. Read more...
Yes. I would recommend that you try conservative treatment first before you consider surgery. Oral anti-inflamatories and steroid injections, custom orthotics, ultasound treatments and streching can be very benificial in trating plantar fasciitis. Only 5% of my patients need surgery for plantar fasciitis. Most patients respond well to conservative treatment. Read more...
Yes . Antiinflammatories are part of conservative treatment or this condition. As are arch supports, stretching, night splints. Surgery should be a last resor only after conservative treatments have failed. Read more...
Combo treatment. . If you have plantar fasciitis, and hurt most with the first few steps in the am, the more you can do together, the better: #1: supportive shoes #2: firm inserts or orthotics #3: oral antiinflammatories (check with your doc) #4: stretching #5: icing (10 min at a time). You may also need physical therapy or cortisone injections, or eswt if available in your area. Surgery is an aggressive option. Read more...
Yes and No. Yes, anti-inflammatory medications are usually given to relieve plantar fasciitis prior to surgery and can often help. However, taking such medications long term can be harmful to the kidneys or cause ulcers. Other options could include MLS Laser treatments. Read more...

I have surgery scheduled for plantar fasciitis this Friday but would like a second opinion. I have tried​ everything my doctor had suggested.

Second opinion. That is a viable option. You wrote in to the health education portion of health Tap. We can not provide a second opinion. Heath Tap Concierge and Prime offer medical advice/ treatment. However, to allow for direct physical examination - consider seeing a podiatrist or orthopedic surgeon in your area. Read more...
Why not a second. The time for a second opinion is before you consent to a fasciotomy. Although the results of surgery are designed to resolve your issues, on occasions, the results are of little value. and in fact can make things worse. It might be best for you to deal with your obvious reluctance and seek another opinion before you allow any procedure to be performed on you. Read more...

Would you recommend PRP or surgery for chronic plantar fasciitis/fasciosis & a spur that hasn't responded to orthotics, PT, steroid injection, taping, stretching?

$$$. Although prp has been recommended, there are mixed clinical papers regarding it's effectiveness. It's popular in europe because it's covered by their healthcare system, but in the us it's hard to shell out $$$ for something that isn't clinically agreed upon as an effective treatment. Surgery, although isn't 100%, has been a mainstay as a last resort. If you have the $$$, go for prp. Good luck. Read more...
PRP? At the hospital where i work prp has not been successful for plantar fasciitis. ( i haven't used it for pf). If all conservative treatment has been unsuccessful a plantr fasciotomy amy be right for you. Usually only the medial band ( the big toe side)needs to be released. Read more...
I have used. Prp and traditional surgery for fascitis that doesn't respond. Prp is expensive and not covered. May try endoscopic plantar fasciotomy. Read more...
Plantar fasciitis. When all else fails , surgery is the right answer. However as with the other clinicians , prp is not covered here . Conventional surgery is very effective with the release of the medial band. Your podiatrist will guide you through this. Good luck. Read more...
PRP. If you have a doctor with experience and a good success rate with the PRP injections , then I would suggest you have the injections. Another conservative treatment would be a series of MLS Laser treatments. I am a surgeon and have performed well over 500 heel surgeries, but I still would try all available non-surgical options first. But, you may still need the surgery anyway. Read more...