3 doctors weighed in:
How will an iron deficiency affect my baby?
3 doctors weighed in

Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Fussy, pale, weak
Young babies often are a bit deficient in iron because they grow so fast, and new growth (new muscle cells, new blood cells, etc.
..) requires iron. Breastmilk or iron-fortified formula supply needed iron for a baby's growth (a baby can double his weight in the first 5 months). A baby who gets too iron-deficient and quite anemic can be fussy, not eat well, seem pale or weak, and have a rapid pulse.

In brief: Fussy, pale, weak
Young babies often are a bit deficient in iron because they grow so fast, and new growth (new muscle cells, new blood cells, etc.
..) requires iron. Breastmilk or iron-fortified formula supply needed iron for a baby's growth (a baby can double his weight in the first 5 months). A baby who gets too iron-deficient and quite anemic can be fussy, not eat well, seem pale or weak, and have a rapid pulse.
Dr. Robert Kwok
Dr. Robert Kwok
Thank
Dr. Scott Katz
Pediatrics
In brief: Many symptoms
Anemia, or low iron, can cause your infant to be pale, irritable, more tired than normal, weak or have rapid heart rate or fast breathing.
It can usually be prevented with a proper diet, which in a breast fed infant means using a multi-vitamin with iron daily. Formula fed infants should only receive iron fortified formula. Pediatricians test for anemia between 9-12 months, and if concerns arise.

In brief: Many symptoms
Anemia, or low iron, can cause your infant to be pale, irritable, more tired than normal, weak or have rapid heart rate or fast breathing.
It can usually be prevented with a proper diet, which in a breast fed infant means using a multi-vitamin with iron daily. Formula fed infants should only receive iron fortified formula. Pediatricians test for anemia between 9-12 months, and if concerns arise.
Dr. Scott Katz
Dr. Scott Katz
Thank
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