Can binge drinking cause brain damage?

Yes. Either directly by its toxic effect, or indirectly by encouraging behavior leading to head injury.
Yes. The loss of brain cells with alcohol depends on how high the alcohol level goes up, and how fast it goes up. Binge drinking causes the alcohol level to rise very quickly to very high levels, which is why people binge drink. The more you do this, the more brain cells you lose. When the binges get close together, you also can get thiamine deficiency with wernicke's (wet brain) similar to alzheimers.

Related Questions

Will one isolated incidence of acute intoxication (10+ standard drinks) cause permanent brain damage in a youth with no previous binge drinking habits

Growing brain. Brain is still growing in teenagers and young brain provided given the correct nutrition can heal the damage. Do a cleanse to heal liver and gall bladder. Acute intoxication is a transient phenomenon. Intensity of intoxication lessens with time, and effects eventually disappear in the absence of further use of the substance. Recovery is therefore complete except where tissue damage exists. Read more...
Depend. It is very individual situation. Everything is possible- depend on genetic predisposition, quality of alcohol, potential combination with other drugs( ecstasy, synthetic marijuana and extr), potential head trauma about which patient might does not remember. You should bring him to er if it is a current event. Read more...

Does the kind of brain damage caused by binge drinking show up on a brain MRI? Could you have a normal MRI result and still have damage?

Yes. Although the damage is microscopic. Whether you binge drink or not alcohol does have a degree of toacicity and damage to your brain. Read more...
Brain damage. Fur brain damage to show up on an MRI it would have to be pretty severe. So yes you could have some degree of brain damage and still have a normal MRI. If available a FMRI. functional MRI may be more useful. Read more...
It can. repeated episodes over a lengthy period of time WILL lead to changes in the brain that show up on MRI. Yes, one can have an MRI that doesn't show abnormalities and still have problems. Read more...
Yes. A regular MRI is not necessarily that sensitive. For instance, there is a form of MRI called "diffusion tensor imaging" which shows brain pathways, and can show other forms of damage not visible on standard MRI. People with binge drinking are often at higher risk for associated injuries including head injuries. For example: http://journal.frontiersin.org/Journal/10.3389/fpsyt.2013.00053/full. Read more...
Vermal Atrophy. The anterior lobe of the mid line cerebellar vermis will be atrophied. It looks as if the leaves have fallen off the tree. (in mid saggital view) Also gives what has been called a step ladder appearance on axial cuts through the cerebellum on both CT and MRI. With more advanced alcohol exposure one sees atrophy of the cerebellar hemispheres. Heat stroke and Dilantin can also cause these changes . Read more...

Is it possible to have brain damage from one episode of binge drinking, and if so, would this be caught on a brain MRI?

No. Although "binge" drinking can damage your brain and your heart too it is unlikely to cause any significant problems with one episode. Keep it up for a few years and then you will see some changes! Read more...
No. A single episode won't hurt much, it is repeated episodes that accumulate damage. And you won't see anything on MRI. Read more...
Yes and no. one episode of binge drinking by itself is unlikely to affect the brain buuut repeated episodes of this type of behavior are unhealthy. An MRI will not show this after one episode. Read more...
No. Really not, unless you drank so much you passed out and depressed your respiratory rate so much that you deprived your brain of oxygen. You may have fried a few extra brain cells, but nothing that would be noticeable. And no, you can't see a hangover on an MRI. Read more...

I have been binge drinking for about 4 months. My brain is slow. Will it last?

Maybe! Severe alcohol abuse can cause serious health issues including problems in your brain functioning; it could affect body's ability to absorb nutrients like vitamins, which can then cause severe and sometimes irreversible cognitive problems. The most common brain disorder associated with alcoholism is the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, which left untreated could lead to death. Read more...

Could binge drinking during years 14-17 interfered with my brain development permanently? I have stopped drinking. Can my brains still catch up?

Yes, yes. Yes binge drinking killed brain cells. The good news is you are young and as humans don't use 90% of their brain cells, so you have lots of brain cells you can still use to "catch up" with what you did during those teen years. But you have to stimulate the brain cells, exercise them. Read, listen to classical music, meditate, do physical exercise, do crosswords - all of this will help your brain! Read more...
Depends. on the extent of associated hypovitaminosis. Quitting will improve you brain capacity and recent evidence suggest the capacity of the brain regenerate neurons. Read more...

If a longtime middle aged weekend binge drinker starts developing blackouts from drinking, does that mean hippocampus or other brain damage?

Time to cut back. Alcohol can certainly cause brain damage (wernicke's encephalopathy). Blackouts are anterograde amnesia caused by alcohol acting on the hippocampus to impair new memory formation. I wouldn't say this person has brain damage yet, but would take this as a sign that he or she should seriously consider reducing their alcohol consumption. Read more...
Alcoholism. It means that this person has drunk enough alcohol for a lifetime. It is time to consider sobriety as a way of life. Continuing to drink when blacking out will eventually lead to death. It is not too late to make a choice not to drink. I would advise at least a thirty day trial of not drinking to see what you feel and know 30 days sober. Read more...
Possible brain atrop. I agree w/drs. Killian & adams that it's time to reduce if not stop drinking alcohol completely. Binge drinking doesn't provide any cardiac benefit associated w/average consumption of 1-2 drinks/d. And check out http://archneur.Jamanetwork.Com/article.Aspx?Articleid=796278 in which more alcohol consumed was associated w/smaller total brain volume eg pickling your brain. While size isn't everything. Read more...

How long after one night of binge drinking does the brain return to %100?

Technically never... The impact of heavy alcohol comsumption, even a single episode, has a negative impact on brain development - especially through the teen years and early 20's. Obviously the degree of impact is mediated by frequency/volume of drinking episodes. Speaking more broadly, studies show that cognition and processing can be hindered for as much as 30 days following a single episode of binge drinking. Read more...