Is lyrica (pregabalin) a narcotic?

No but...... Narcotic is more a legal term than a medical term. It does not necessarily refer to just opiate type medications. In general i think Lyrica (pregabalin) is a very helpful medicine, and i rarely see any addiction problems, however i did have a recent case of Lyrica (pregabalin) dependence. With that said most patients even with addiction history may still try this med if indicated and monitored.
Lyrica (pregabalin) Lyrica (pregabalin) is not a narcotic eventhough is a controlled substance. It is an antiseizure medication.
Not exactly. Lyrica (pregabalin) is an anti-neuropathic medication with a wide area of application for various painful disorders. It is a "scheduled" substance, but it is not a traditional narcotic as in opioids such as morphine, oxycodone, etc.

Related Questions

Is Lyrica (pregabalin) a narcotic? WHAT CAN I do for sever leg pain? I do not want a narcotic

No it's not. But it is a scheduled substance which needs to be prescribed by a doctor. Lyrica (pregabalin) has a reasonable chance of working as a pain reliever. "Try it, you'll like it..." Perhaps, you're too young to remember that adage but seriously Lyrica (pregabalin) is good for certain types of pain. It may work for you. Want more info? Write me: www.healthtap.com/drsaghafi. Read more...
Lyrica (pregabalin) No, Lyrica (pregabalin) is NOT a narcotic. It is considered a "neurologic". It does nottarget the opiod receptor like narcotics do. It is used for Neuropathic pain such as diabetic neuropathy, pain associated with spinal cord injury or post-herpetic neuralgia along with Fibromyalgia. Read more...
No. Lyrica (pregabalin) is not a narcotic. The most important is to find out was is causing the pain. Treat the disease not the symptoms. Is it one leg or two? Does it go anywhere? Where did it start? Etc. Sometimes its harder than others to find a cause but it is usually possible. Then treatment can be targeted to that disease. Read more...
No, Lyrica ( pregabalin) is not a narcotic painkiller, it's effect to diminish chronic and acute pain is related to interaction with calcium channels and neurotransmitters, not opiod receptors per se. To help you most, it is very important to try to establish the diagnosis, i.e. the reason for the leg pain, some of them can require urgent attention.. You need to see the doctor, I am afraid. Read more...

How does lyrica (pregabalin) work? Is it similiar to narcotic pain medicine? Or similiar to tramadol as norepinephrine and serotonin reuptake inhibitor?

Lyrica (pregabalin) Dear pika89800 lyrica enhances gaba in the brain and suppresses pain at a cortical level, pain has 3 main levels, local, spinal and brain (cortex), it is non narcotic, it is an antiseizure medication and can sometimes help both pain and anxiety the answer is purely for educational purposes, please contact your md. Read more...
Complex. I refer you to an excellent discussion of it's effects on the alpha2 delta subunit of voltage gated calcium channels in the brain that can be found on wikipedia.Com. Read more...

Diagnosed with interstitial cystitis. Tylenol, (acetaminophen)narcotic pain pills, diet change give no pain relief. Will Lyrica help. My twin says it helps her IC pain?

AZO - OTC - works. The OTC pills work for many of my friends and patients. If not, your PCP can Rx - Gantrisin /pyridium. No reason to step up to psychotropic type meds for a urinary tract issue. Take it step by step. Drink lots of water. Ask doctor for ideas to prevent recurrence - it can become chronic and it's great to nip it in the bud. Bst wishes! Read more...

Was addicted to opiates for years bc chronic nerve pain (CRP) Now on suboxone. Pain intolerable. Had surgery, lyrica, (pregabalin) gabapentin, (can't take NSAID - bleed.) Non -narcotic suggestion? Any help at all?

Pain or addiction. For addiction, the psychological and social issues are most important, group (mainly group) and individual counseling with suboxone works in the majority. While I cannot say in your particular case, nerve pain, is treated with practically Any pill that damps down nerves (anti-epileptics--lyrica/gabapentin/others; Lidocaine or Lidocaine like drugs--amitryptiline) Read more...
Alternative therapy. Have you tried acupuncture? Are you exercising regularly? Also, meditation could help. Read more...
Think holistically. Medications are one way of controlling nerve pain. Pain is a complex holistic process. You may be able to decrease need for meds by addressing other issues. That includes nutrient status, stress or emotional trauma that may have accompanied or pre-dated the injury, and movement and use of the limb. It's a complex topic. You might look for a doc who does integrative or functional medicine. Read more...