7 doctors weighed in:

Do nsaid pain relievers make most people sick to their stomachs, or am I unusual?

7 doctors weighed in
Dr. Alfredo Nieves
Gynecology
2 doctors agree

In brief: NSaids

One of the major side effects of nsaids is gastritis even causing ulcers.
They should be taken on a full stomach and stop them if heartburn is present.

In brief: NSaids

One of the major side effects of nsaids is gastritis even causing ulcers.
They should be taken on a full stomach and stop them if heartburn is present.
Dr. Alfredo Nieves
Dr. Alfredo Nieves
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Dr. Sassan Hassassian
Anesthesiology
2 doctors agree

In brief: Varies

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents (nsaids) are effective pain medications which exert their effect by decreasing inflammation.
They all affect stomach lining and other organs. Higher dose and duration of treatment increase risk. Those with pre-existing stomach illness, elderly, etc. Are at higher risk. Combination with some other medications or alcohol increase risk as well.

In brief: Varies

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents (nsaids) are effective pain medications which exert their effect by decreasing inflammation.
They all affect stomach lining and other organs. Higher dose and duration of treatment increase risk. Those with pre-existing stomach illness, elderly, etc. Are at higher risk. Combination with some other medications or alcohol increase risk as well.
Dr. Sassan Hassassian
Dr. Sassan Hassassian
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Dr. Charles Turck
Pharmacology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: It can happen

NSAIDs reduce the protective lining in the stomach.
Long-term, high doses can lead to ulceration and possible bleeding (which is dangerous), so the question becomes what the reason is for chronic use and whether you’re keeping your doc in the loop. If you need NSAIDs over a long period of time, coordinate with your doc to be sure you’re protected.

In brief: It can happen

NSAIDs reduce the protective lining in the stomach.
Long-term, high doses can lead to ulceration and possible bleeding (which is dangerous), so the question becomes what the reason is for chronic use and whether you’re keeping your doc in the loop. If you need NSAIDs over a long period of time, coordinate with your doc to be sure you’re protected.
Dr. Charles Turck
Dr. Charles Turck
Thank
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