What is a bunion? And hallux valgus?

Structural deformity. Some differences, but basically used interchangeably. Bunions are a bony prominence with joint misalignment. They are progressive, structural deformities. You can improve the symptoms with better shoes, but you can't improve the deformity. My rule of thumb: if the deformity bothers you on a regular basis or is limiting your activity, then surgery is an option to consider. Dr l.
See below. A bunion is just the enlargement of the bone on the outside of the 1st metatarsal head. Hallux valgus is the malpositon of the 1st metatarsal and 1st toe where the big toe turns in towards the 2nd toe.
Abnormal "bump" A bunion is a progressive disorder that is often described as a bump on the side of the big toe joint which may become painful. The visible bump actually reflects changes in the framework of that joint and possibly adjacent joints. In later stages, the big toe may lean towards the second toe which throws the bones out of alignment – producing the bunion’s “bump” which may lead to pain.

Related Questions

Is a bunion (hallux valgus) a repairable injury?

Yes. Bunion deformity is always a repairable injury. Visit eastpennfoot.Com and request a copy of our report on bunions. Read more...
Yes. A bunion is seldom injury related. It is generally a hereditary tendency toward a deformity where the great toe drifts toward the smaller toes and the joint behind it buckles outward. This creates a prominence which rubs in shoes. If shoe changes don't help, surgery is often recommended. It's an outpatient procedure and seldom requires a cast or crutches. Read more...
Yes... It's more of a deformity than an injury. There are many surgical procedures for it's correction. See a podiatrist, have x-rays taken and evaluated, have a surgical consultation and then decide if you want it done. Read more...
Yes. Bunions are certainly repairable. The two questions that need to be addressed are when to have surgery and which procedure to do. A board certified podiatrist will examine the foot, take x-rays and discuss the proper procedure for the best result. When to have surgery depends on your degree of pain and impact on your lifestyle. Don't take shortcuts. Do the procedure and take the recovery time needed for the best result. Read more...
See following answer. See my other answer. Had some technical issues with this response. Read more...
Yes. Depending on the severity of the bunion and on a variety of other factors including a patient’s age, general health, and location of pain, there are various types of bunionectomy procedures that can be performed. Read more...

Is it risky to undergo a bunion operation for hallux valgus?

Talk to your Surgeon. All surgery carries risks that include but are not limited to swelling, bleeding, pain, infection, need for further surgery, complications from anesthesia that include the potential for death. In the case of surgery on the extremities, these risks also include limb loss. While risks are low, it is imperative that you discuss any questions or concerns that you have with your surgeon preoperatively. Read more...
Good results. While risks are inherent to all surgery, a well performed bunion surgery yields excellent results. Read more...
Surgery has risks. Most patients do well with bunion surgery. It is extremely important to follow post op instructions. Not following instruction can reduce the quality of the results. Dr l. Read more...
Seek experience. The chance of complications, while relatively low, should be reviewed by your surgeon. If you are asking about getting the best result you should seek an experienced foot surgeon who performs bunion surgery on a regular basis and can show you before and after results and happy patient testimonials. Read more...
Some risks. Risks of any surgery include, pain swelling, numbness, infection, reaction to medication, blood clot, and possible scar overgrowth. Read more...
Surgery. As stated , there is risk with any surgery . However , read these answers and you get a really good synopsis . Speak to your podiatrist and get x rays done and a treatment plan. Read more...

What exercises can I do if I had bunion (hallux valgus) surgery?

Range of motion. Try and bend your toe up and down. Surgery usually will initially decrease some range of motion, so you want to make sure to prevent or break up any post op adhesions. Read more...
Use a Dynasplint. I fit all my patients with a dynasplint toe unit postoperatively who need increased range of motion. In a published paper we demonstrated that with a dynasplint the range of motion returned quicker and patients were able to use the splint more consistently than home exercises alone. Read more...

I was born with hallux valgus (bunions) on both of my feet. My identical twin sister does not have this deformity. How can this happen?

Strange. Yes, bunions can have a genetic component, especially juvenile bunions; however there are many outside factors that can cause bunions. Does your sister wear a different style shoe, or have a different gait pattern? If you were truly born with them and had bunion deformity as a small child, i agree it is strange that your sister did not as well. Maybe one gene mutated? Genetics is not my field. Read more...
Genetic trait, but. Not all the children will inherit the trait. I must admit that if you are identical twins this is rather unusual. Read more...

Genu valgum (knock knees) and hallux valgus (bunions) is ruining my life, I want the leg amputated; who will do it?

No one. Although these conditions may be painful, they are treatable with nonsurgical means. I understand your frustration, but leg amputation is not the answer (you can ask any injured veteran or diabetic amputee). I hope you seek out guidance and help, face to face with a physician or therapist. Good luck. Read more...
Seek. Attention from orthopedic surgeon. Amputation is not the answer nor an option. Read more...
NO amputation... There are a number of surgical options that can help you greatly without giving up on your leg. An amputation is not an answer to your current problems. Read more...
There are options. Consult with your orthopedic surgeon regarding your condition as amputation is not your best option. Read more...
See orthopedist. Both if these conditions can cause pain and dofficulty with activities. If they are causing significant problems with your life you should see an orthopedist for an evaluation. Both of these conditions can be surgically corrected. Read more...

What happens in surgery for hallux valgus?

Depends. There are too many methods to list here for hallux valgus; from a simple 'bumpectomy' to significant reconstruction. Technique chosen is based on etiology, biomechanics, and patient factors such as age, activity, smoking, previous compliance, etc. Some examples include osteotomies (surgical bone fractures) to correct alignment, fusions to prevent abnormal motion, etc. Many require fixation. Read more...
Surgically realign. During hallux valgus surgery depending on procedure the bone is surgically broken and realigned with with screws or pin for stability of the broken bone. Usually after the procedure you are put in a walking boot or cast for a period of 4-8 weeks again depending on the procedure chosen to correct your deformity. Please go to eastpennfoot.Com for more information. Read more...
Re-alignment. Various surgical procedures are available to treat hallux valgus depending on the type and severity of the deformity. The procedures are designed to correct abnormalities of soft tissues, remove the prominent “bump” of bone, correct the changes in the bony structures, and to realign the big toe and associated structures. The goal of surgery is to reduce pain and improve function. Read more...
Bunion surgery. If you elect to have it surgically removed, there are several ways your surgeon could go about it. Depending on the angle of your bones (you'll need an x-ray), there are many different procedures to choose from to correct your foot. The more aggressive procedures may require a bone cut and a screw, crutches and a boot afterward for several weeks. Read more...

What is the treatment hallux valgus?

The condition Is . When the great toe deviates towards the lateral aspect of the foot, towards the lesser toes and the first metatarsal deviated towards the midline of the body. Treatment is wider shoes or surgery, this is often referred to a bunion as well. Read more...
Either or. Conservative treatment options include shoes with more room for the toes, local shoe stretching and padding of the bunions. These measures provide comfort and may be suitable for some. If these measures fail, surgery can provide longterm relief and correct the deformity. There is no one bunion surgery, and depending how severe the bunion is can be involved. Talk to an experienced foot surgeon. Read more...
Sugical management. Various surgical procedures are available to treat hallux valgus depending on the type and severity of the deformity. The procedures are designed to correct abnormalities of soft tissues, remove the prominent “bump” of bone, correct the changes in the bony structures, and to realign the big toe and associated structures. The goal of surgery is to reduce pain and improve function. Read more...

Hi doctors, can you tell me what is hallux valgus deformity?

A misnomer. For one. Hallux - big toe valgus - is a position on the frontal plane where an object is everted. In podiatry this is often the term used to describe a big toe being directed at the mpj towards the second toe. Sometimes referred to as a bunion (again, not entirely true.). Read more...
Complex... Deformity of the great toe and its metatarsal. The 1st metatarsal is deviated away from the rest of the forefoot bones (abducted), and the great toe (hallux) runs over the 2nd toe, sometimes overlapping/ underlapping it in the more severe cases. Read more...