What are some gluten-free diets for autoimmune diseases that are not celiac?

Why? There are 2 reasons for avoiding gluten - either you have celiac disease or you just don't want to eat wheat, oats & barley. Gluten is the current "evil" food accused of causing virtually all disease just as yeast & glucose were similarly lambasted in previous decades. If you believe that your autoimmune disease may be improved by avoiding gluten then avoid it for a few weeks. I hope it works.

Related Questions

Are there any studies that demonstrates the efficacy of a gluten free diet for autoimmune diseases?

Not yet but... If such studies have been done I am not aware of them, but there is evidence that many with autoimmune disease have gluten sensitivity and i would be extremely surprised if a gluten-free diet did not result in significant benefits for these patients. There are no studies showing it would not help. See http://huff.To/1fnjx1a ; http://www.Ncbi.Nlm.Nih.Gov/pmc/articles/pmc2111403/. Read more...
Celiac disease. Celiac disease is considered an autoimmune disease, and a gluten-free diet is the main way of treating it therapeutically: http://tinyurl.Com/k98d4v7 also the paleo diet (which is also gluten free) has been used with some benefit in a pilot study of secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (also an autoimmune disease): http://tinyurl.Com/khgpl9g. Read more...
No reason why. Gluten intolerance is considered an autoimmune disease affecting a small but significant number of individuals. If you are not gluten intolerance, avoiding it would make no difference on other diseases whether autoimmune or not. However you will likely be less inclined to gain weight since so many great desserts contain gluten. No evidence that gluten issue leads to other autoimmune disorders. Read more...

I have coeliac/celiac disease meaning that I can't eat gluten. How dangerous is airline gluten-free diet?

Not at all. Airlines and other companies are very aware of this issue and assume a great deal of liability when they purport something to be gluten free. You can feel confident that they have made very sure their claim is true. Read more...

I'm very short and I found out I have celiac disease. Can following a gluten free diet increase my height growth?

Depends on situation. Linear growth is ossible as long as the growth centers in the long bones are still open .Once they have closed after puberty, linear growth is done. Id cd is found and treated early enough, before the growth centers close then some catch up growth is possible.Some cd patients have unrecognized cross sensitivity to other foods that cam hamper improvement.(egg, milk, chocolate, etc.). Read more...

Gluten free diet. Is this a fad? Is there any point if you don't have celiac disease?

Yes & YES!!! Yes, it is a fad, but for good reason. While less than 1% of those in the US have celiac disease, experts estimate ~10% have gluten sensitivity, distinct from celiac, which often causes GI symptoms, headaches & fatigue. Tests for celiac are negative so a trial of avoiding gluten is the best current test. See www.webmd.com/digestive-disorders/celiac-disease/features/gluten-intolerance-against-grain. Read more...
Food sensitivities. Some with GI distress feel better if they eliminate foods from their diet. Recently, the low-fodmaps diet is gaining traction for decreasing food hypersensitivity symptoms (these are not allergies!). Wheat based foods may be harder to digest, pull water into the gut, get fermented by bacteria and therefore increase gas in the gut. Stretch of the gut wall by fluids and gas cause GI symptoms. Read more...
Yes. Some people who don't have celiac do have gluten intolerance or gluten sensitivity. For them they are best avoiding gluten found in wheat, rye and barley. Celiac is a specific autoimmune disease to gluten. You can have a sensitivity or intolerance without being making autoimmune antibodies to it. Read more...

Are there psychological symptoms of celiac disease that also go away with a gluten-free diet?

Probably. No one has looked at this scientifically, as it's very difficult to measures states of mind. However, it makes sense scientifically, as immune responses going on in the body slow down the mind and make one feel generally ill. Anecdotally, i've seen folks with real celiac disease feel better overall soon after successful gluten elimination, but it won't help those without the real disease. Read more...