How effective are tubal ligations for preventing fertility?

Very effective. Failure rate or chance of conceiving after tubal sterilization is ~1.85% over a 10-year period, and may vary slightly based on how tubal sterilization was achieved (e.g. Electrocoagulation, clip, ring, salpingectomy-postpartum vs. Interval).
Failure of a tubal. The effectiveness of a tubal ligation in preventing pregnancy (a tubal doesn't prevent your getting pregnant if you have a reversal or opt for ivf) is equivalent to using oral contraceptive, in other words it has a very low failure rate.

Related Questions

How common are tubal ligations?

Tubal ligation. There are three-quarter million tubl ligations done in the U.S. Every year. It has surpassed the birth control pill as the most commonly used contraception years ago. Paticularly among women who are in the 30's and 40's, and who have completed their family, tubal ligation is the number one contraception. Read more...

Can tubal ligations be reversed?

Yes, but expensive. It is possible to have the tube "religated" but the longer since the ligation, the less chance of success. Also, it is highly surgeon-dependent as well. The procedure takes much longer to reverse comparing to the ligation. In addition, it is not reimbursable and so you likely have to foot the bill (i would guess 6 to 10g). If u r considering, consult doc and look for experienced surgeon. Good luck. Read more...

Where do I go to get a tubal ligations reversal done with a medical card?

Good luck! Fallopian tube re-anastomosis is usually done microscopically and is quite tedious. Most surgeons require non-insurance payment as many companies do not cover the cost of the procedure. Read more...

Do normal pap smears show tubal ligations?

No... The pap smear is a test designed to detect cervical cancer and cervical cancer precursors (premalignant cells). The pap test can also be used to diagnose certain infections such as herpes, bacterial vaginitis, trichomonas, and yeast infections. The pap test does not assess the patency (open versus closed) status of fallopian tubes. Read more...
No. A pap smear looks for abnormal cells in the cervix, including the cells that can lead to cervical cancer. It tells you nothing about the status nor function of the fallopian tubes. Read more...